How Tim Hortons keeps rolling up a winner after 30 years

Tim Hortons' Roll Up the Rim to Win campaign has stood the test of time and raked in huge profits over 30 years because it's simple and catchy, a marketing expert says.

See Full Article

Brand specialist Tony Chapman says Tim Hortons' 30-year-old promotional campaign has survived longer than most contests ever do, because of its "play factor" and the company's willingness to stay the course.

"A lot of times, marketers get bored with a campaign faster than the consumer," Chapman told CTV News Channel on Thursday.

But Roll Up the Rim is different, Chapman said, because Tims has stuck with a "brilliant" game that is fun to say and fun to play.

"It's become part of the vernacular. Everybody tries to roll their 'R's when they're doing it," Chapman said.

He added that the game is appealing, on a basic level, because it encourages people to play with the product, and offers an instant "thumbs up-thumbs down" result. Chapman said other promotional games are more complicated. McDonald's Monopoly, for instance, requires the customer to collect tabs over several visits to the restauarant, in hopes of winning a prize.

“It's a very cumbersome game," he said of the Monopoly contest.

Chapman said Tim Hortons has taken some strong steps this year to keep its 30-year-old contest fresh, such as incorporating it into a mobile app, and offering digital "Roll Up the Rim" chances to customers who buy cans of Tim's coffee from the grocery store.

However, he also suggested the company should re-think its prize selection to target younger consumers, and perhaps move away from offering the TVs and cars it typically gives out.

"The millennials are who they're going to have to win over in the next five years," Chapman said. "A lot of millennials don't even want a car."



Advertisements

Latest Economic News

  • TD Bank reviewing sales practices, CEO Bharat Masrani tells AGM

    Economic CBC News
    TD Bank says it is reviewing concerns about its sales practices in light of reports that some employees allegedly broke the law in order to meet sales targets and keep their jobs. CEO Bharat Masrani says the bank received "a few hundred complaints" last year regarding its sales practices that were escalated. Source
  • TD Bank reviewing sales practice concerns: CEO

    Economic CTV News
    TORONTO -- TD Bank says it is reviewing concerns about its sales practices in light of reports that some employees allegedly broke the law in order to meet sales targets and keep their jobs. "As we have done in the past with matters of such importance, we will be relying on our board as well as the objective advice from a leading professional services firm to make sure we really test ourselves," CEO Bharat Masrani said during the bank's annual shareholder meeting Thursday. Source
  • CIBC hikes bid for Chicago-based PrivateBancorp

    Economic CTV News
    TORONTO -- CIBC is increasing its takeover offer for Chicago-based PrivateBancorp by 20 per cent, valuing the U.S. financial services company at about C$6.6 billion. Toronto-based CIBC (TSX:CM) had made its original offer in June 2016. Source
  • Dollarama says it sees plenty of room to expand in Canada

    Economic CTV News
    MONTREAL - Dollarama Inc. says it has plenty of room to grow in Canada, following a strong fourth quarter and a review of the market's long-term potential. The Montreal-based company says it has conducted a long-term review of its plans and determined the Canadian market can support up to 1,700 of its stores over the next eight to ten years -- 300 more than Dollarama's previous estimate. Source
  • Trudeau, Wynne in Windsor for Ford announcement

    Economic CBC News
    Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is in Windsor, Ont., to make an announcement at the Essex Engine Plant alongside top Ford executives. Prime Minister Trudeau heading to Windsor for Ford announcement 280 Ford employees back to work after announcement, says union Source
  • Casino mogul Phil Ruffin among Trump's closest friends

    Economic CTV News
    WASHINGTON -- Billionaire Las Vegas casino owner Phil Ruffin has never been to the White House. On Thursday, he'll have dinner there with his friend, Donald Trump. "It's a lonely job, and I have been friends with him for a long time. Source
  • Four injured in explosion at Rio Tinto facility in Quebec

    Economic CTV News
    SOREL-TRACEY, Que. -- Four people were taken to hospital Thursday morning after an explosion at the Rio Tinto Iron and Titanium plant in Sorel-Tracy, Que. The extent of the injuries are not known, although they are not believed to be life-threatening. Source
  • Five people taken to hospital after explosion at Rio Tinto facility in Quebec

    Economic CTV News
    SOREL-TRACEY, Que. -- Five people were taken to hospital Thursday morning after an explosion at the Rio Tinto iron and titanium plant in Sorel-Tracy, Que. Company spokeswoman Claudine Gagnon says the workers were being treated for shock. Source
  • Specialty sand market heats up as oil, gas drilling rebounds

    Economic CTV News
    CALGARY - Signs of the Canadian oil and gas industry's recovery from a punishing two-year downturn are emerging in unlikely places, including fine grains of sand. Demand for the especially round and crush-proof type of sand used to help extract shale oil and gas is climbing, as more drilling rigs get fired up and operators pump higher amounts of sand into wells, say industry watchers, who foresee a big jump in the year ahead. Source
  • U.S. shrugs off threat of AI on workforce as Canada frets

    Economic CTV News
    WASHINGTON - Should we be preparing for the coming invasion of job-stealing, career-crushing robots? It's a question that's moved from science-fiction novels to the tip of policy-makers' tongues.Scroll down or click here to vote in our poll of the day Canadian and American policy-makers have just delivered very different answers. Source