Roll up right: How to properly claim Tim Hortons prizes

Tim Hortons' quintessentially Canadian contest, Roll Up The Rim, is back this year with a few tweaks to the contest, including an adjustment to make it easier to claim gift cards.

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CTVNews.ca has pored over the fine print on 2016's Roll Up the Rim contest rules, so here's what you need to know as you plot a caffeine-fuelled binge to win big.

Coffee and doughnuts

Most Canadians know the deal with winning a minor Tim Hortons prize: winners tear off their tab and present it at a Tim Hortons restaurant to claim their prize.

Approximately 30 million coffee and 12.85 million doughnut prizes are up for grabs. Free coffee winners can choose any size hot beverage, and free doughnut winners can choose any single muffin, cookie or doughnut.

Overall odds of winning are one-in-six, according to the official contest rules.

But when it comes to winning larger prizes, such as a gift card or a vehicle, the rules are more complex.

Winning big

Tim Hortons includes PIN codes on its winning $100 gift card tabs, so winners can redeem their prize quickly online, or mail it in instead. However, if the PIN code is not included with the mail-in claim, the prize will be rejected.

That's what happened last year, when a woman from Newfoundland missed out on a $100 gift card because she mailed in the part of the tab with the winning message written on it, but did not save the part with the PIN.

Tim Hortons spokesperson Hailey DeDominicis says the PIN codes have been repositioned on winning cups, so winners don't accidentally miss their PIN code.

"This year we have moved the PIN code to the middle of the winning tab to decrease the chance of guests cutting off this information," DeDominicis told CTVNews.ca, in an email statement.

Anyone who wins a larger prize must hold onto the winning tab, in full, and submit it by mail along with a prize claim form to Tim Hortons.

According to the contest rules: "Potentially winning rim tabs must include the entire prize message printed under the rim. Contest sponsor reserves the right in its sole discretion to reject any potentially winning rim tab if the prize message is not present in its entirety."

Prizes must be redeemed by the end of the day on May 8, 2016.

E-coffees and mail-order cups

Technically, you don't need to buy a coffee to roll up the rim. Canadians can request a roll-up cup by sending a letter and a self-addressed, stamped envelope to:

Tim Hortons Contest Cup & Rules

PO Box 13293, Saint John N.B., E2L 5E7

Tim Hortons has also launched a website with a roll-up minigame, which gives users the chance to enter prize draws by "rolling up" virtual coffees once every hour. Prizes on the site include free coffee for a year, a 4K TV, a watch and a car.



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