Roll up right: How to properly claim Tim Hortons prizes

Tim Hortons' quintessentially Canadian contest, Roll Up The Rim, is back this year with a few tweaks to the contest, including an adjustment to make it easier to claim gift cards.

See Full Article

CTVNews.ca has pored over the fine print on 2016's Roll Up the Rim contest rules, so here's what you need to know as you plot a caffeine-fuelled binge to win big.

Coffee and doughnuts

Most Canadians know the deal with winning a minor Tim Hortons prize: winners tear off their tab and present it at a Tim Hortons restaurant to claim their prize.

Approximately 30 million coffee and 12.85 million doughnut prizes are up for grabs. Free coffee winners can choose any size hot beverage, and free doughnut winners can choose any single muffin, cookie or doughnut.

Overall odds of winning are one-in-six, according to the official contest rules.

But when it comes to winning larger prizes, such as a gift card or a vehicle, the rules are more complex.

Winning big

Tim Hortons includes PIN codes on its winning $100 gift card tabs, so winners can redeem their prize quickly online, or mail it in instead. However, if the PIN code is not included with the mail-in claim, the prize will be rejected.

That's what happened last year, when a woman from Newfoundland missed out on a $100 gift card because she mailed in the part of the tab with the winning message written on it, but did not save the part with the PIN.

Tim Hortons spokesperson Hailey DeDominicis says the PIN codes have been repositioned on winning cups, so winners don't accidentally miss their PIN code.

"This year we have moved the PIN code to the middle of the winning tab to decrease the chance of guests cutting off this information," DeDominicis told CTVNews.ca, in an email statement.

Anyone who wins a larger prize must hold onto the winning tab, in full, and submit it by mail along with a prize claim form to Tim Hortons.

According to the contest rules: "Potentially winning rim tabs must include the entire prize message printed under the rim. Contest sponsor reserves the right in its sole discretion to reject any potentially winning rim tab if the prize message is not present in its entirety."

Prizes must be redeemed by the end of the day on May 8, 2016.

E-coffees and mail-order cups

Technically, you don't need to buy a coffee to roll up the rim. Canadians can request a roll-up cup by sending a letter and a self-addressed, stamped envelope to:

Tim Hortons Contest Cup & Rules

PO Box 13293, Saint John N.B., E2L 5E7

Tim Hortons has also launched a website with a roll-up minigame, which gives users the chance to enter prize draws by "rolling up" virtual coffees once every hour. Prizes on the site include free coffee for a year, a 4K TV, a watch and a car.



Advertisements

Latest Economic News

  • Chevron says it has won the latest round in an Ecuadorian legal battle

    Economic CTV News
    Oil giant Chevron Corp. says it has won a round in the Canadian courts in a complex legal battle with a group of Ecuadorian villagers who are trying to collect on a massive judgement they won in Ecuador's courts. Source
  • Liberals ask President Trump to approve Keystone XL pipeline

    Economic CTV News
    Canada’s natural resources minister says that he hopes the new U.S. administration will allow the Keystone XL pipeline quashed by Barack Obama to proceed, noting that all Canadian regulatory approvals are in place. Jim Carr spoke to CTV’s Power Play from Washington, D.C. Source
  • Apple depicts Qualcomm as a shady monopolist in US$1B lawsuit

    Economic CTV News
    SAN FRANCISCO -- Apple is suing mobile chip maker Qualcomm for $1 billion in a patent fight pitting the iPhone maker against one of its major suppliers. The 100-page complaint filed Friday in a San Diego federal court depicts Qualcomm as a greedy monopolist abusing its power in a key segment of the mobile chip market to extort royalties for iPhone innovations that have nothing to do with Qualcomm's technology. Source
  • Trump's 'America first' tone worries head of Canadian oil and gas industry group

    Economic CTV News
    Trump takes charge: Sworn in as 45th president of the U.S.A. Source
  • Obama administration urges Canada to reverse Super Bowl ad decision

    Economic CTV News
    OTTAWA - In one of its final communications with Canada, the outgoing Obama administration is engaging in pigskin politics: asking the Trudeau government to overturn a regulation affecting ads during the Super Bowl. The U.S. Source
  • Oil and stock prices higher as Donald Trump sworn in

    Economic CBC News
    Stock markets responded to the first day of the Trump Administration in a largely positive way, with the Dow Jones, the Nasdaq and the S&P 500 all higher on the day of his swearing in. The Dow Jones Industrial Average was up by nearly 100 points to 19,829 just minutes before the new president formally acceded to the position. Source
  • Stocks higher as Donald Trump lays out glimpse of future economic policies

    Economic CBC News
    Stock markets responded to the first day of the Trump Administration in a largely positive way, with the Dow Jones, the Nasdaq and the S&P 500 all higher on the day of his swearing in. The Dow Jones Industrial Average was up by nearly 100 points to 19,829 just minutes before the new president formally acceded to the position. Source
  • Stocks close higher as Donald Trump lays out glimpse of future economic policies

    Economic CBC News
    Stock markets responded to the first day of the Trump Administration in a largely positive way, with the Dow Jones, the Nasdaq and the S&P 500 all higher on the day of his swearing in. The Dow Jones Industrial Average was up by nearly 100 points to 19,829 just minutes before the new president formally acceded to the position. Source
  • Navdeep Bains defends open borders for global trade in Davos speech

    Economic CBC News
    Automakers on both sides of the border fear the potential negative effects of a Donald Trump presidency, Canada's economic development minister said Thursday as he met with international business and political leaders in Switzerland. Navdeep Bains said he's been having nervous conversations with concerned automakers, both at the recent auto show in Detroit and during his current visit to the World Economic Forum in Davos. Source
  • Will Trump end globalization? The doubt haunts Davos' elite

    Economic CTV News
    DAVOS, Switzerland -- It's been impossible to escape the shadow of Donald Trump at this year's gathering of the business elites at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. Uncertainty over what Trump will do once he takes office Friday and whether his presidency will mark the end of globalization dominated discussions all week at this event, which more than any has become synonymous with international business. Source