Iranian president bids for U.S. investment

ROME -- Iranian President Hassan Rouhani invited American businessmen to join their European counterparts in investing in Iran as he wrapped up three days of multi-billion dollar deal-making in Italy by saying the lifting of European sanctions had opened a new era of "win-win" collaboration.

See Full Article

Rouhani heads next to Paris, where his originally scheduled visit was called off after the Nov. 13 attacks.

Rouhani told reporters that he and Pope Francis discussed the need for religious leaders to speak out against extremism and terrorism during their audience Tuesday. But in an apparent reference to the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo, Rouhani said freedom of expression "doesn't mean offending that which is sacred to other people's faith."

Francis was asked last year about the Charlie Hebdo attacks and suggested that a violent reaction could be expected when someone's faith was insulted. He said while violence must be condemned, anyone who insults his mother can expect to be punched.

Rouhani concurred and said Francis had told him the anecdote. While saying extremist violence must be condemned, "All religions are to be respected, their books and the millions of people who follow the faith," Rouhani said. Insulting them, he said, "creates division and doesn't help anyone."

Rouhani's visit was aimed at pushing Iran into a more prominent role on the world stage after the nuclear deal with Western powers ended most European economic sanctions on Tehran.

He said that Europe and the U.S. had lost out as a result of the sanctions, but that now European countries were in a position to not only recover their traditional trading relationship but improve on it. Italy signed some 14 agreements representing billions of euros in deals in areas such as energy, industrial machinery, shipbuilding and transportation.

Such a positive relationship could exist with the U.S. if Congress were to "end the tensions and hostility," Rouhani said.

"It's possible, but the key is in Washington, not in Tehran," he said. "At the same today, if American investors and the heads of the American economy, if they want to come to Iran and invest in my country, there are no problems from our point of view."

He added that it was in Washington's interest to no longer isolate Iran given the geopolitical reality of the region, saying it shouldn't be pressured by the Israeli and Jewish lobby, which he said "are very influential in the U.S."

"The Americans know well the important regional questions, that without Iranian presence, without the Iranian contribution, without Iranian opinion, these questions will not be resolved," he said. "The Middle East is a very sensitive, very delicate region. We hope that the Americans end the hostility and this enmity and rather than always look to the past let them look more to the future."



Advertisements

Latest Economic News

  • Takata Corp. files for bankruptcy in Japan and U.S. following air bag recalls

    Economic Toronto Sun
    Japanese air bag maker Takata Corp. has filed for bankruptcy protection in Tokyo and the U.S., overwhelmed by lawsuits and recall costs related to its production of faulty air bag inflators. The company announced the expected action Monday morning Tokyo time. Source
  • From condoms to caskets: merchandise marks Canada's 150th birthday

    Economic CBC News
    It's been said that Canadians are not brash about their patriotism, but you wouldn't know it from the variety of merchandise, big and small, being snapped up in advance of Canada's 150th birthday July 1. From T-shirts to hats, flags to flasks, condoms to caskets, goods adorned with celebratory logos are popping up faster than you can say sesquicentennial. Source
  • Canadian lumber producers brace for second round of softwood lumber duties

    Economic CTV News
    MONTREAL -- Canada's softwood lumber industry is bracing for a second wave of U.S. duties expected to come Monday that could put further pressure on producers, particularly smaller ones, to cut jobs. The U.S. Source
  • Warning labels might be coming to cheese: CBC's Marketplace consumer cheat sheet

    Economic CBC News
    Miss something this week? Here's the consumer news you need to know from CBC-TV's Marketplace. Get this in your inbox every Friday. Sign up here. Fake drugs American prosecutors accuse CanadaDrugs.com and its CEO Kris Thorkelson of selling unapproved and counterfeit cancer drugs to U.S. Source
  • Debt, protectionism could drag down improving global economy

    Economic CTV News
    FRANKFURT -- The global economy has picked up and prospects for the next few months are the best in a long time. But the recovery is maturing and faces risks from populist rejection of free trade and from high debt that could burden consumers and companies as interest rates rise. Source
  • Air bag maker Takata bankruptcy expected Monday

    Economic CTV News
    DETROIT -- Drowning in a sea of lawsuits and recall costs, Japanese air bag maker Takata Corp. is expected to seek bankruptcy protection in Tokyo and the United States early Monday. Takata was done in by defective air bag inflators that can explode with too much force, spewing out shrapnel. Source
  • Air bag maker Takata files for bankruptcy in Japan, U.S.

    Economic CTV News
    Japanese air bag maker Takata Corp. has filed for bankruptcy protection in Tokyo and the U.S., overwhelmed by lawsuits and recall costs related to its production of faulty air bag inflators. The company announced the expected action Monday morning Tokyo time. Source
  • How Sears' troubles could hasten radical change in Canada's malls

    Economic CBC News
    Sears' plan to shut down 59 of its locations is grim news for the chain's landlords across Canada. Could it also spell doom for the nation's neighbourhood malls? Anchor tenants — typically big department stores — have always been a critical component of mall design. Source
  • Proposed rules for CRA amnesty program could expose more tax-cheat advisers

    Economic CBC News
    The Canada Revenue Agency is tightening its amnesty program for tax cheats, including a proposed rule that could expose more of the shady advisers who set up dodgy tax schemes to help clients hide their money. Source
  • Italian PM 'guarantees' savers' accounts in 2 troubled banks

    Economic CTV News
    ROME -- Italy's premier says holders of accounts in two troubled Italian banks will have their savings guaranteed despite insolvency proceedings. Premier Paolo Gentiloni was referring to Veneto Banca and Banca Popolare di Vicenza, each struggling with unpaid loans. Source