Airlines cancel more than 5K flights due to U.S. storm

Airlines cancelled more than 5,500 flights in the U.S. and beyond this weekend as a blizzard conditions, cold and ice hits much of the U.S.

See Full Article

, with East Coast cities feeling the most impact.

The bulk of Saturday's 4,298 cancellations are at airports in the New York City and Washington metro areas, according to flight tracking service FlightAware. Another 1,235 flights were cancelled for Sunday. Those cancellationscentre on Philadelphia, Washington and New York, with airlines essentially shutting down all flights into those cities.

One bit of good news: Saturday is the slowest travel day of the week. There were a little more than 22,000 flights scheduled to, from or within the U.S., according to FlightAware. That's about 5,000 fewer flights -- and 400,000 fewer passengers -- than Thursday or Friday.

By Sunday afternoon, however, the airlines hope to be back to a full schedule to handle the typical influx of business travellers heading out to start a week on the road.

All major airlines have issued waivers for travel over the weekend, allowing passengers to rebook onto earlier or later flights to avoid the storms. The airports included vary by airline but include some cities in Kentucky, Tennessee and West Virginia all the way up the coast to New Hampshire and Massachusetts. As of late Friday night, American Airlines alone has issued waivers for 42 airports.

For those looking to cancel their trips, they need to wait until the airline officially cancels calls off the flight. Airlines have been much more proactive in recent years about cancelling flights, often doing so up to a day in advance. More travellers are impacted, but they aren't stuck waiting in airports. It also lets airlines restart the system quicker because they have planes and crews in place.

If your flight is cancelled and maybe you are stuck at the airport, consider taking these actions:

  • If your flight is cancelled -- and you are at the airport -- get in line to speak to a customer service representative. But also call the airline directly. If the phone lines are jammed, try the airline's overseas numbers. You'll pay long-distance rates but might not have to wait. (Put those numbers in your phone now.) Finally, consider sending a tweet to the airline.
  • There are more to airline lounges than free drinks and lights snacks. The real secret to the lounges is that the airline staffs them with some of its best -- and friendliest -- ticket agents. The lines are shorter and these agents are magically able to find empty seats. So consider buying a one-day pass. It typically costs $50, but discounts can sometimes be found in advance online.
  • If weather causes cancellations, use apps like HotelTonight and Priceline to find last-minute hotel discounts for that night. Warning: Many of the rooms are nonrefundable when booked, so lock in only once you are stuck.


Advertisements

Latest Economic News

  • Car rental companies agree to pay $1.25M penalty for advertising impossible discounts

    Economic CBC News
    Two of Canada's largest car rental companies have agreed to pay $1.25 million in penalties for falsely advertising discount prices that are essentially impossible to obtain. Canada's Competition Bureau has reached what it calls a "consent agreement" with Hertz and Dollar Thrifty whereby both companies will pay penalties totalling $1.25 million and "ensure their advertising complies with the law and implement new procedures aimed at preventing advertising issues in the future. Source
  • Guide to 'fake news' wins $30,000 National Business Book Award

    Economic CTV News
    TORONTO -- A timely guide to distinguishing fact from fiction in the era of "fake news" was announced Monday as the winner of the $30,000 National Business Book Award. Neuroscientist Daniel J. Levitin said he was prompted to write "A Field Guide to Lies: Critical Thinking in the Information Age" (Allen Lane Canada) as a response to the "Balkanization of the news over the last 15 years. Source
  • Montreal couple hid winning $55M lottery ticket in daughter's toy box

    Economic CTV News
    MONTREAL -- A Montreal couple who won $55 million in a lottery jackpot hid the winning ticket in their daughter's toy box over the weekend. Nathalie Langlais and Gilles Rosnen picked up their winnings at Loto-Quebec headquarters in Montreal on Monday, three days after the Lotto Max draw. Source
  • Capital markets not a place for 2nd chances, OSC lawyers tell Drabinsky hearing

    Economic CBC News
    Lawyers for Ontario's securities regulator said today in their closing statements that Garth Drabinsky, who defrauded investors of an estimated $500 million, should not be allowed to participate in the capital markets. Pamela Foy, senior litigation counsel with the Ontario Securities Commission, says the capital markets are not the place for second chances and the commission cannot allow Drabinsky to be in a position where he could do more damage. Source
  • Luxury shoe brand Jimmy Choo goes up for sale

    Economic CTV News
    LONDON -- Shares in Jimmy Choo have leapt 11 per cent after its board put the luxury shoe brand up for sale. The gains bring the market value of the firm that began in east London to over 700 million pounds ($896 million). Source
  • Hertz and Thrifty to pay $1.25M fine following probe into their advertising

    Economic CTV News
    OTTAWA - Car rental companies Hertz Canada Ltd. and Dollar Thrifty Automotive Group Canada Inc. have agreed to pay a total of $1.25 million in penalties following an investigation into their advertising by the federal Competition Bureau. Source
  • U.S. Supreme Court rejects GM appeal to block ignition switch lawsuits

    Economic CBC News
    The United States Supreme Court has turned away an appeal from General Motors Co. seeking to block dozens of lawsuits over faulty ignition switches that could expose the company to billions of dollars in additional claims. Source
  • Qatar Airways sees 'manageable' decline in flights to U.S.

    Economic CTV News
    DUBAI, United Arab Emirates -- The CEO of one of the Middle East's largest carriers said Monday passenger numbers to the United States have dipped slightly over fears by some Muslim passengers that their visas may be rejected upon arrival, but expressed confidence in President Donald Trump as a "very good businessman. Source
  • Extra EI help to hard-hit regions tops $1 billion, surpassing budget estimates

    Economic CTV News
    OTTAWA -- The federal government says it has paid out more than $1 billion in extra employment insurance benefits to out-of-work Canadians in the hardest-hit economic regions of the country, blowing past what the Liberals estimated the program would cost. Source
  • Home Capital says founder Gerald Soloway to leave board, CFO to change role

    Economic CBC News
    Home Capital Group Inc. said Monday that two people named in an Ontario Securities Commission action against the company will be moving out of their roles. The embattled mortgage lender said chief financial officer Robert Morton will shift out of that role after the company files its first-quarter results. Source