Anxiety in the air as Davos World Economic Forum kicks off

DAVOS, Switzerland -- As stock markets around the world took another dive amid concerns over plunging oil prices and China's slowdown, anxiety clouded the air in the Swiss ski resort of Davos, where the World Economic Forum's annual meeting kicked off Wednesday.

See Full Article

With Europe's main indexes down another 3 per cent or so and many around the world officially in bear territory, powerful global executives in Davos voiced a high degree of concern over the outlook for the global economy. Some said the recent turbulence in financial markets was akin to a "meltdown," while others sought to describe it as a natural adjustment.

"The new normal is a low-growth world," said Martin Sorrell, chairman of U.K.-based advertising giant WPP.

Whatever the description, uncertainty and the recent turn in global growth fortunes dominated discussion at the 45-year-old annual gathering of political and business leaders in the Alps.

Sorrell also worried that too-low inflation in many parts of the world was reducing the pricing power of companies, which they need to generate the returns needed to invest and boost growth. Instead of using their cash to invest in projects to promote growth, companies are increasingly sitting tight and often rewarding shareholders with big dividend payments and buybacks.

And as for consumers, Sorrell said they remain wary -- nearly eight years after the global financial crisis saw the collapse of many banking groups and triggered the deepest recession since World War II.

That wariness is why consumers don't appear to be using the windfall garnered from low oil prices. Money saved at the pump could be used for spending elsewhere, but that doesn't appear to be happening now.

Min Zhu, Deputy Managing Director of the International Monetary Fund, which on Tuesday cut its global growth forecast, said global political uncertainties are behind much of the recent market volatility, and the reason for companies' reluctance to invest $7 trillion or so of cash lying in the banks.

Tensions in the Middle East are among those uncertainties. Iran's foreign minister, speaking Wednesday to The Associated Press at Davos, denounced new U.S. sanctions over Iran's ballistic missile program and warned that warmer diplomatic ties with Washington remain "far away" despite a landmark nuclear deal.

To boost global growth, Zhu said it's paramount that governments make deep changes to things like pension systems and labour markets, given that there's little room on interest rates and budgets are stretched.

Paul Singer, CEO of hedge fund Elliot Management, blames a "very distorted policy mix" following 2008 for the current turmoil, because it saw the burden put heavily on the shoulders of monetary policy. His suggestion to help soften the impact of future shocks is to make the banking sector more resilient and transparent.

The plunge in oil prices was also identified as a growing threat to the world's goal to reduce emissions.

The head of the International Energy Agency, which advises oil-importing countries, said the drop in costs for oil and gas threatens to reduce governments' incentives to improve energy efficiency -- in transportation networks, for example -- as well as the installation of renewable energy plants.

Fatih Birol says energy efficiency has been driven largely not so much by environmental concerns but an interest in saving money, which is disappearing as fossil fuels become cheaper.

World governments agreed in Paris in December to limit the rise in global temperatures, a move that will require a ramp-up in the amount of energy that comes from renewable sources.

Birol warned a panel of energy experts gathered in Davos: "For renewables, life will not be easy."

The head of the International Chamber of Commerce, John Danilovich, told The Associated Press in Davos that 2016 has already been very "unsettling" for global businesses, and adapting investment to meet lower-emissions goals will be among several struggles for companies this year.



Advertisements

Latest Economic News

  • Euro tumbles after Italy's PM resigns, loses referendum

    Economic CBC News
    The euro tumbled in early Asian trade on Monday after Italian Prime Minister Matteo Renzi said he would resign after conceding defeat in a referendum over his plan to reform the constitution. The euro dropped 1.3 per cent to $1.0505 US, falling below its 1 1/2-year low of $1.0518 touched late last month, and testing its key support levels where the currency has managed to rebound in the past couple of years. Source
  • Company sold turf product after learning of defects: report

    Economic CTV News
    WOODBRIDGE, N.J. -- The country's leading maker of artificial sports turf sold more than 1,000 fields to towns, schools and teams nationwide after its executives knew they were falling apart faster than expected and might not live up to lofty marketing claims, according to an investigation by a news organization. Source
  • Montreal-based company sold turf product after learning of defects: report

    Economic CTV News
    WOODBRIDGE, N.J. -- The country's leading maker of artificial sports turf sold more than 1,000 fields to towns, schools and teams nationwide after its executives knew they were falling apart faster than expected and might not live up to lofty marketing claims, according to an investigation by a news organization. Source
  • U.S., China, EU, others fail to reach environmental goods deal

    Economic CTV News
    GENEVA -- Forty-six countries including the U.S., China and European Union nations failed Sunday to agree on a list of "environmental goods" like solar-powered air conditioners or LED light bulbs that could be targeted for lower tariffs. Source
  • Venezuela to issue new bills with current ones worth no more than 2 U.S. cents

    Economic CTV News
    BOGOTA -- Venezuela said it will issue higher-denominated bills as triple-digit inflation and a currency meltdown leave the country's largest note worth just around 2 U.S. cents on the black market. The central bank said in a statement Saturday that six new bills ranging from 500 to 20,000 Bolivars will begin circulating on Dec. Source
  • Six things to know about the bovine TB outbreak: CFIA's chief veterinary officer

    Economic CTV News
    OTTAWA -- More than 22,000 cattle at farms in Alberta and Saskatchewan are quarantined due to bovine tuberculosis, causing hardship for ranchers and millions in compensation payments and other costs. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency is testing cattle to determine the extent of the outbreak and the source of the contagious bacterial infection. Source
  • U.K.'s Boris Johnson downplays EU payment suggestions

    Economic CTV News
    LONDON -- Britain's foreign secretary has dismissed suggestions that London would be willing to pay into European Union coffers following an exit from the bloc, describing the idea as speculation. Boris Johnson's comments to the BBC on Sunday came after Britain's minister for leaving the European Union, David Davis, said that the country might be willing to pay in return for access to the single market. Source
  • Beyond the hippie stereotype: A closer look at the opposition to Trans Mountain

    Economic CBC News
    A conversation about tripling your money on a tech start up might seem out of place at an anti-pipeline march, but not so in Vancouver. When thousands of protestors made their way from City Hall to downtown a few weeks ago, chatter about stock options and where to go for ramen after the rally could be heard alongside the traditional indigenous drumming and chants of "Hey, hey, Trudeau, Kinder Morgan's got to go". Source
  • Using Air Miles for overseas flights? It may not be a great deal

    Economic CBC News
    You've saved your Air Miles for a well-deserved overseas adventure — but don't pack your bags just yet, as you may be in for a surprise. Seventeen million Canadians collect Air Miles reward points on everything from groceries to gas. Source
  • Airbnb drops lawsuit against NYC over new state law

    Economic CTV News
    NEW YORK -- Airbnb has agreed to drop a lawsuit against New York City over a new state law it said could have deterred hosts and impaired its revenues. The settlement was reached Friday. Source