Business elite meet in shadow of report: 62 own same wealth as half the planet

DAVOS, Switzerland -- The world's political and business elite are being urged to do more than pay lip service to growing inequalities around the world as they head off for this week's World Economic Forum in the Swiss ski resort of Davos.

See Full Article

Two reports published Monday, from Oxfam and public relations firm Edelman, warned that the widening gap between the haves and have-nots since the global financial crisis is undermining a decades-long effort to reduce global poverty and fueling the rise of populist politicians.

According to Oxfam, the scale of the problem is increasingly stark: just 62 people, it says, own the same wealth as half the planet. The compares with 388 people just five years ago, when the global economy was just emerging from its deepest recession since the Second World War.

While the wealth of the poorest half of the world's population -- more than 3.6 billion people -- has fallen by a trillion dollars, or 41 per cent, since 2010, Oxfam said in its report that the wealth of the super-elite has risen by around half a trillion dollars.

Though acknowledging that dealing with inequalities has become a part of discussions in Davos, Oxfam said it's time for leaders to do more than just acknowledge the problem, especially if they want to hit poverty-reduction targets.

"It is simply unacceptable that the poorest half of the world's population owns no more than a few dozen super-rich people who could fit onto one bus," said Winnie Byanyima, Oxfam International Executive Director, who will again attend Davos, having co-chaired last year's event.

Tax havens, she said, are at the core of the rigged system that allows big corporations and wealthy individuals to avoid paying their fair share of tax.

"I challenge the governments, companies and elites at Davos to play their part in ending the era of tax havens, which is fuelling economic inequality and preventing hundreds of millions of people lifting themselves out of poverty," said Byanyima. "Multinational companies and wealthy elites are playing by different rules to everyone else, refusing to pay the taxes that society needs to function."

Oxfam reckons around $7.6 trillion of individuals' wealth sits offshore, around 12 per cent of the total, and that around $190 billion could be made available for poverty-fighting initiatives if tax were paid on that wealth. Closing the loopholes, which Oxfam says are used by nine out of ten of the WEF's sponsoring corporations, will help governments meet their goal of eliminating extreme poverty by 2030.

Over the past few years, those voicing concerns over growing inequalities have increased. Even the International Monetary Fund has warned of the perils to growth stemming from this gap.

According to Edelman, inequalities within society are already driving political change and that could put a break on economic potential.

In its annual survey of trust levels around the world, it found the largest-ever gap between the views of highly educated people and those with fewer years of schooling, driven by a disparity in income.

Edelman found general level of trust in institutions -- government, business, media and non-governmental organizations -- among college-educated people around the globe up 4 percentage points at 60 per cent, its highest level in the survey's 16 year-history. For the wider public, Edelman's trust gauge was up 2 percentage points at 48 per cent.

It noted that the U.S. has the biggest disparity in trust within its population, followed by Britain and France. Edelman's online survey of 33,000 plus respondents in 28 countries, was conducted between Oct. 13 and Nov. 16, 2015.

"We are now observing the inequality of trust around the world," said Richard Edelman, the president and CEO of Edelman. "This brings a number of potential consequences including the rise of populist politicians, the blocking of innovation and the onset of protectionism and nativism."

Around the world, there's been a groundswell of support for what were previously considered fringe political leaders and parties. Edelman noted the rise of Donald Trump, who is in a seemingly strong position in the race to be the Republican Party's candidate in the presidential election this fall, the politics of many countries are in flux.

Spain has seen the anti-austerity Podemos party perform strongly in last month's general election, while polls suggest that Marine Le Pen, leader of the far-right Front National in France, could be contesting the presidential runoff next year.

Edelman said that following the global financial crisis and global recession, most of the income gains have gone to the better-off, who have also benefited from low mortgage rates and rising house prices.

For those lower down the income scale, Edelman said the years since have been marked by a growing sense of insecurity and anger. Bad behaviour by banks, politicians and even the likes of German car giant Volkswagen further eroded trust.

"The trust of the mass population can no longer be taken for granted," said Edelman.



Advertisements

Latest Economic News

  • Early cannabis sales 'unbelievably high' after legalization: feds' U.S. consultant

    Economic CTV News
    OTTAWA -- A U.S. consultant hired by Ottawa to assess Canada's eventual recreational pot market says jurisdictions that regulate cannabis should expect "unbelievably high" sales growth in the first few years as criminals are driven out of business. Source
  • Yo ho ho! Pennsylvania aims to smash U.S. embargo on Cuban rum

    Economic CTV News
    HARRISBURG, Pa. -- Pennsylvania's Cuban rum run got its start in a chance meeting last fall in the parking lot in front of the state capitol. "'You know, we have rum,"' a visiting Cuban government liaison told state Sen. Source
  • Is this the future of college: Online classes, but no degree

    Economic CTV News
    WASHINGTON -- Connor Mitchell's university classes take place online, he doesn't have any exams and he studies in a different country every year. Is he looking into the future or taking a gamble? With college costs rising steadily and with more courses available online for free, some observers are beginning to question the need for a traditional college education that may include lectures on Greek philosophy but burden students with massive debt. Source
  • New York City pitches to Canadian tourists amid 'Trump slump'

    Economic CTV News
    TORONTO -- New York's tourism industry is worried U.S. President Donald Trump's "America First" policies are turning off Canadian visitors, and they're heading north this week to woo Canucks and their tourism dollars. The head of New York City's official tourism organization, NYC & Company, minces no words in admitting he's keen "to counter a little bit of the negative rhetoric that is coming out of Washington. Source
  • Iconic Dad's chocolate chip cookies discontinued, customers bitter

    Economic CBC News
    For months, some Canadians have been searching in vain for their beloved Dad's chocolate chip cookies. A current Facebook thread on the topic is full of tales about quests for the item. Source
  • U.S. economy expanded at weakest pace in 3 years in first quarter of 2017

    Economic CTV News
    WASHINGTON -- The U.S. economy turned in the weakest performance in three years in the January-March quarter as consumers sharply slowed their spending. The result fell far short of President Donald Trump's ambitious growth targets and underscores the challenges of accelerating economic expansion. Source
  • Montreal landlord fined after tenants rent out condo illegally

    Economic CTV News
    A Montreal landlord says he’s been fined more than $1,200 because the tenant living in his condo listed the space on Airbnb without his knowledge. Gerry Galiatsatos said his unit came with tenants when he purchased it less than a year ago. Source
  • Swedish cows in a great moooo-d as summer pastures open

    Economic CTV News
    DROTTNINGHOLM, Sweden -- Despite a cold wind and chilling temperatures, spring has come to Sweden. At least, spring for the milk cows. In an annual event that warms hearts across the country, "koslapp" -- the cow release -- has become a popular family outing for urban residents. Source
  • Trump to spend Day 100 in office talking trade

    Economic CTV News
    WASHINGTON -- U.S. President Donald Trump is marking his 100th day in office by talking tough on trade.Trump's first 100: Day-by-day highlights Analysis: We've read all President Trump's tweets, so you don't have to The White House says the president will sign an executive order Saturday that will direct his Commerce Department and the U.S. Source
  • Trump says he's brought 'profound change' to Washington

    Economic CTV News
    WASHINGTON -- U.S. President Donald Trump on Saturday marked his 100th day in office by saying he had brought "profound change" to Washington and reaffirming that "my only allegiance" is to those he governs.Trump's first 100: Day-by-day highlights Analysis: We've read all President Trump's tweets, so you don't have to During an evening trip to Pennsylvania, one of the states that propelled his unlikely election victory, Trump planned to sign an executive order directing the Commerce Department…