New discount airline offers Canadian flights for $89

A new, ultra-cheap, all-Canadian airline is poised to take off next month, with low-cost flights running between seven smaller Canadian airports in five different provinces.

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NewLeaf Travel is promising non-stop trips beginning on Feb. 12, with flights running out of airports in Nova Scotia, Ontario, B.C., Saskatchewan and Manitoba. Flights will cost between $89 and $149, which includes all airline fees and additional taxes.

“We want to spread the love to Canada’s smaller airports because of their laid back atmosphere, cheaper parking and awesome baggage handling,” a statement says on the company’s website.

The airline will operate between the following cities:

  • Halifax, N.S.
  • Hamilton, Ont.
  • Winnipeg, Man.
  • Regina, Sask.
  • Saskatoon, Sask.
  • Abbotsford, B.C.
  • Kelowna, B.C.

NewLeaf says it plans to operate two to three flights per week to each destination, using five Boeing 737-400s supplied by its partner company, Flair Airlines. Each aircraft is capable of carrying approximately 150 passengers.

NewLeaf announced its pricing structure at a launch event on Wednesday. The cheapest flights cost $89, to fly between Kelowna, Regina, Saskatoon and Abbotsford, while the most expensive flight is a $149 ticket to travel from Hamilton to Kelowna. The company says its one-way fares are “inclusive of all taxes and fees.”

In addition to the cost of a ticket, passengers will be charged a fee for carry-on baggage, seat selection, priority boarding and in-flight snacks, the company’s website says.

NewLeaf sells tickets on its website, instead of through a booking site.Tickets are also available by phone at 204-888-BOOK, between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. ET.

Although the flights are cheap, some travellers might consider NewLeaf’s coverage to be somewhat spotty. For instance, travellers can catch a one-way flight from Hamilton to Kelowna, Regina, Saskatoon or Halifax, but NewLeaf does not offer a return flight from any of those cities. The only NewLeaf flight into Hamilton is from Winnipeg.

NewLeaf says it plans to expand its fleet and number of flights in the years ahead. For now, the company plans to focus on leisure and vacation flights, and will not be running daily flights.

According to NewLeaf’s website, the airline is a privately-owned Canadian company based out of the James Armstrong Richardson International Airport in Winnipeg. Its partner, Flair Airlines, is based in Kelowna.

NewLeaf arrives in the Canadian market less than half a year after another small airline, Halifax-based CanJet, suspended its operations. CanJet operated charter flights using a Boeing 737-800, based out of Toronto’s Pearson Airport.

With files from The Canadian Press

NewLeaf Travel Winter Schedule



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