Cape Bretoners worried after local coal mine recruits in Alberta

Cape Breton residents are cautiously optimistic that the reopening of a coal mine in Sydney, N.S., will help bring jobs to a place where the unemployment rate of 14 per cent is double the national average.

See Full Article

But a job fair held Tuesday had some concerned that locals could get shut out. That’s because the company planning to reopen the Donkin Mine held its recruitment drive on the other side of the country, in Grande Cache, Alta., where a coal mine shut down on Christmas Eve putting 200 people out of work.

Cape Breton resident Art Baxter, 60, is among the unemployed local miners hoping to land one of the estimated 120 jobs the Sydney mine could bring.

“I’m pretty sure there’s a few guys around, including myself, that did all kinds of mining and can go in there for the next four or five years,” Baxter told CTV Atlantic.

Cape Breton councillor Kevin Saccary, the son of a coal miner and a booster of the project, also said he hopes mining company Kameron Collieries will give locals a crack at the work.

“I believe we have all kinds of qualified individuals,” he said. “I certainly don’t think it should take much effort for the company to have a job fair here.”

Local resident Stewart Wadden, however, pointed out that many miners in Cape Breton are either retired or had moved “out west” and would simply be returning. (Nova Scotia loses thousands of residents each year to Alberta, according to Statistics Canada’s most recent data.)

Wadden is also skeptical that the mine will even open. The company said it’s hoping to start work in the spring.

One reason for skepticism is declining demand, as energy companies are pushed to switch away from coal in favour of power generation that emits less pollution.

Ontario eliminated coal power in 2014 and Alberta’s premier said late last year that that province will phase out coal by 2030.

Even China, by far the world’s biggest coal consumer, has announced a three-year moratorium on new coal plants in an effort to reduce dangerous levels of air pollution.

The depressed market has led to dozens of coal mine closures in the U.S., and the total elimination of coal mining in the U.K.

But Nova Scotia has said it won’t stop using coal until at least 2042, making the province’s power utility a possible customer in the coal market that has so many locals hopeful for work.

With files from CTV Atlantic and The Canadian Press



Advertisements

Latest Economic News

  • Canada open to completing NAFTA talks in short order

    Economic CBC News
    Canadian negotiators are open to working on a timeline proposed by the U.S. to complete NAFTA renegotiations before the end of the year, CBC News has learned. A government source, speaking on background, tells CBC News that Canada is willing to work quickly, but will not agree to a bad deal for the sake of meeting a deadline. Source
  • U.S. wants NAFTA talks to wrap up before year's end, but is it possible?

    Economic CBC News
    Canadian negotiators are open to working on a timeline proposed by the U.S. to complete NAFTA renegotiations before the end of the year, CBC News has learned. A government source, speaking on background, tells CBC News that Canada is willing to work quickly, but will not agree to a bad deal for the sake of meeting a deadline. Source
  • B.C. premier and jobs minister sued by fired LNG advocate claiming $5M

    Economic CTV News
    VANCOUVER -- British Columbia's fired liquefied natural gas advocate is suing Premier John Horgan, the province's jobs minister and a New Democrat MP in a lawsuit claiming $5 million in damages. Gordon Wilson alleges in a statement of claim filed in B.C. Source
  • Millennials in Atlantic Canada most optimistic about owning homes

    Economic CTV News
    Do millennials think they can afford to buy a home? If they live in Atlantic Canada, the answer is a lot more likely to be yes. That’s according to a new online survey of 1,000 Canadians aged 25 to 30, conducted by Leger Marketing from real estate firm Royal LePage. Source
  • Can millennials afford to buy a home? It depends where they live

    Economic CTV News
    Do millennials think they can afford to buy a home? If they live in Atlantic Canada, the answer is a lot more likely to be yes. That’s according to a new online survey of 1,000 Canadians aged 25 to 30, conducted by Leger Marketing from real estate firm Royal LePage. Source
  • $500K hardship fund for former Sears Canada employees approved by judge

    Economic CBC News
    A judge has approved a hardship fund for former Sears Canada employees that will come from a pool of money set aside to pay bonuses for key employees. The $500,000 fund will help former employees facing difficulty who would have otherwise been eligible for severance payments when they lost their jobs at the retailer. Source
  • Elevated testosterone linked to 'reckless' financial trading, study finds

    Economic CBC News
    It's no secret financial traders have always been predominately male. So, when a group of researchers with the Ivey Business School at Western University in London, Ont., set out to at look at the role of testosterone on the markets, it wasn't a far-flung idea. Source
  • Brazil to ask for WTO panel to settle dispute over Bombardier subsidies

    Economic CTV News
    MONTREAL -- Brazil says it will ask the World Trade Organization to establish a dispute settlement panel after consultations with Canada failed to resolve its complaint about government subsidies to aircraft manufacturer Bombardier. The South American country said it will ask the WTO to examine more than 20 subsidy programs granted to the Montreal-based company for the development of its CSeries aircraft. Source
  • Bombardier employee in Swedish unit charged with bribery

    Economic CBC News
    A Russian employee in the Swedish branch of Canadian plane and train maker Bombardier was charged Friday with aggravated bribery and faces up to six years in jail and deportation if found guilty. Swedish prosecutor Thomas Forsberg alleges Evgeny Pavlov bribed a public servant in Azerbaijan to win a $340-million contract for a new signalling system. Source
  • Bombardier says Russian worker charged with bribery doesn't reflect its values

    Economic CTV News
    MONTREAL -- Bombardier says the filing of formal criminal charges in Sweden on Friday against a railway employee doesn't reflect its values. "We take these allegations very seriously as they assert conduct that does not reflect our values or the high standards we set for ourselves, our employees and our partners," the Montreal-based company (TSX:BBD.B) said in a statement. Source