Shoppers line up for Boxing Day savings in biggest sales event of the year

TORONTO -- For Boxing Day shopping, Durga Baudel had a plan of attack.

Instead of lining up outside a downtown Toronto Best Buy when it opened at 6 a.m.

See Full Article

, he had a friend scope out the scene, and call him when it wasn't too busy.

He ended up scoring a printer at a steep discount -- 60 per cent off. His friend, the one who tipped him off, got a new TV. And it only took them two hours, start-to-finish.

"I saved $120 (on the printer), so I'm happy," Baudel said.

While some have said that Boxing Day is losing steam in favour of Black Friday, a Best Buy spokesperson said the day after Christmas is still their biggest shopping day of the year.

Elliott Chun said the store's Boxing Day deals are typically a little better than those on Black Friday, although the November shopping event is a popular day to pick up Christmas gifts.

And on both days, the country is moving toward shopping online, favouring websites and mobile apps over bricks-and-mortar stores.

But that didn't stop crowds from forming at the Toronto Eaton Centre, which brimmed with people toting massive shopping bags in the early afternoon.

"I think for a lot of people, it's a tradition to come to Boxing Day. We've seen crowds at every store, waiting for the doors to open at 6 a.m.," Chun said, adding that about 150 people lined up outside the downtown Vancouver store early Saturday morning and more than 400 people lined up outside the downtown Toronto location.

In downtown Montreal, where many big retailers opened midday, lineups outside popular stores like Victoria's Secret and H&M stretched around the block.

Onkar Jha said he waited in line about half an hour to get inside an Apple store, where he spent about $1,500 on an iPad, watches and electronics.

He said he saved at least $300, which in his estimation made the trip well worth his time.

"Too bad it's only one day," he said.

Meanwhile, all was quiet on Saturday at shopping malls in Atlantic Canada, as businesses there remained closed for Boxing Day. Sales in that region start on Sunday.

But in some cases, police were forced to get in on the action.

Thirty kilometres west of Toronto, police in Mississauga, Ont., arrested two people for an alleged assault over a parking spot at busy Square One shopping centre. One person suffered minor injuries.

Meanwhile, a police force in Port Moody, B.C., tweeted some sage advice: "If you're engaging in the gladiatorial event known as Boxing Day shopping, do not leave the spoils in your vehicle. Thieves are out too."

With files by Morgan Lowrie and Gemma Karstons-Smith



Advertisements

Latest Economic News

  • Trump pledges border tax, less red tape and trade renegotiations on first weekday in office

    Economic CBC News
    The new U.S. president doubled down on some of his campaign promises on Monday, including punitive tax hikes for U.S. companies that ship jobs overseas and sharp reductions in corporate taxes, red tape and regulations. Source
  • Statistics Canada says wholesale sales gained 0.2 per cent in November

    Economic CTV News
    OTTAWA -- Statistics Canada said Monday that wholesale sales gained 0.2 per cent in November to total $56.9 billion, as a drop in the auto sector limited overall gains for the month. The second consecutive monthly increase fell short of the 0.5 per cent for the month that had been expected by economists surveyed by Thomson Reuters; however, the October figures were revised 0.2 per cent higher than previously reported. Source
  • McDonald's sales rise globally, but dip in U.S.

    Economic CTV News
    NEW YORK -- McDonald's global sales rose 2.7 per cent at established locations as growth overseas offset a drop in the U.S. The world's biggest burger chain attributed the decline at home to a tough comparison from the year-ago quarter, when it launched its all-day breakfast menu. Source
  • McDonald's sales dip in U.S., underscoring comeback challenges

    Economic CTV News
    NEW YORK -- McDonald's is trying stage a comeback, but still has plenty of work to do in its flagship U.S. market. The world's biggest burger chain said U.S. sales dipped 1.3 per cent at established locations for the final three months of 2016. Source
  • United Airlines computer glitch cancelled and delayed flights

    Economic CTV News
    CHICAGO -- United Airlines says six flights were cancelled and 200 more were delayed because of a computer problem that forced a ground stop for all domestic flights that lasted about 2 1/2 hours Sunday. Source
  • Kuwait state oil company says onshore leak contained

    Economic CTV News
    KUWAIT CITY -- Kuwait's national oil company says it has contained an oil leak at one of its southwestern oil fields. Monday's statement by the Kuwait Oil Co. did not identify the onshore oil field affected by the leak, which began Sunday. Source
  • Stockpiling only cash in TFSA may hurt investors long term: experts

    Economic CTV News
    TORONTO -- Financial planner Jason Heath's mind boggles when he thinks about the high percentage of Canadians stockpiling what he calls "dead money" into tax-free savings accounts. "There's a lot of average Canadians out there that have been led to believe that parking a few thousand dollars in a TFSA in cash, or a near-cash equivalent investment paying one per cent, is somehow a good idea," says Heath, managing director of Objective Financial Partners in Toronto. Source
  • Union asks PM to reject advice to relax anti-dumping duties on cheap U.S. drywall

    Economic CTV News
    CALGARY -- A union that represents workers in Canadian drywall factories is telling the prime minister a decision that could help the construction business might cost its members their jobs. The International Brotherhood of Boilermakers have written Justin Trudeau asking that cabinet reject a trade tribunal's recommendation to relax anti-dumping duties that were imposed on imported U.S. Source
  • Marijuana business expands beyond smoke and rolling papers: Don Pittis

    Economic CBC News
    Jamie Dutra has just finished unlocking the doors and rolling back the security screens at The Dragon, a shop in Toronto's Bloor West Village that is part of a Canadian investment trend. Only five minutes after opening time, there are two customers and a reporter in the small shop. Source
  • Understanding why Alberta farmers loathe the carbon tax

    Economic CBC News
    They are the stewards of the land, the so-called first environmentalists, and they rely heavily on the weather and predictable climate to grow food to put on your plate. That's why it's somewhat surprising that Alberta farmers are resoundingly opposed to the key government policy to help the environment and meet climate change goals — a carbon tax. Source