WestJet aims for 12,000 'mini miracles' in 24 hours

WestJet is hoping to spread the holiday cheer, by asking its employees to perform 12,000 "mini miracles" in the span of 24 hours.

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The type of good deeds vary -- from giving away flights to reunite military families, handing out free TVs and offering flowers at arrivals -- but airline staff were visible in their blue Santa hats at WestJet destinations around the world.

"WestJetters and their blue hats all over the network – from London, to Yellowknife, to Costa Rica, to Hawaii – will be joining me in making 12,000 mini miracles happen over a 24-hour period," says a Santa dressed in all-blue garb in the company's promotional video.

"It is going to be a long day – I'm going to need more cocoa," he adds.

By Wednesday afternoon, the company said that nearly 10,000 "mini miracles" had been performed.

Earlier in the day, WestJet staff and the blue Santa handed out toys, games, as well arts and crafts in Halifax.

Blue #Santa at @BGCCAN in #Halifax to drop off toys, games, arts and crafts. On to Toronto! #WestJetChristmaspic.twitter.com/xoUmrFXyxo

— WestJet (@WestJet) December 9, 2015

Blue Santa later ran into Alan Doyle, lead singer of the Canadian folk band Great Big Sea.

And then this happened. I'll have a Blue Christmas #WestJetChristmaspic.twitter.com/e2NqmbwCaH

— Alan Doyle (@alanthomasdoyle) December 9, 2015

At Saskatoon's airport, WestJet staff warmed the hearts of travellers by giving away hot chocolate.

The airline's employees also dropped by a Calgary homeless shelter to hand out winter gear and cookies.

Big thank you to the folks @westjet who are here delivering warm winter gear and delicious cookies to our clients. pic.twitter.com/PCea56OWtm

— Calgary Drop-In (@calgarydropin) December 9, 2015

Between all the good deeds, WestJet staff also found some time for fun, starting an impromptu snowball fight at Grouse Mountain in Vancouver.

Impromptu snowball fight with the @WestJet team #westjetchristmaspic.twitter.com/eOXSwQgIz3

— Grouse Mountain (@grousemountain) December 9, 2015

Across the pond in London, employees gave out toys, candy and flowers to arrivals at Gatwick Airport.

Toys for toddlers, a sack of sweets, blankets for the flight, flowers at arrivals... Happy #WestJetChristmas! pic.twitter.com/MTHZpVgdtY

— Gatwick Airport LGW (@Gatwick_Airport) December 9, 2015

This isn’t the first time the airline has performed Christmas miracles.

Last year, the company celebrated the holidays by bringing gifts and throwing a party for the village of Nuevo Renacer in the Dominican Republic.

And in 2013, travellers at two Canadian airports told Santa what they wanted for Christmas, only to receive those presents when they arrived at their destinations.



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