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Canadian family begs government for help to return as adopted daughter needs medical care

When Derek and Emilie Muth left Calgary to adopt their daughter Zoe in Nigeria last October, they had no idea that nearly a year later — after a terrifying medical ordeal and the onset of a global pandemic — they'd still be stuck abroad with no word on when they can come home.
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Vancouver Island couple triumphs over 'garden-variety bully' in battle for renowned hotel

The Vancouver Island couple who built Sooke Harbour House into one of Canada's most renowned tourist destinations has won a resounding victory in their battle to wrest control of their beloved hotel away from a pair of purported financiers.
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We looked at every confirmed COVID-19 case in Canada. Here's what we found

Canada's first known case of COVID-19 was detected eight months ago this week. As of Sept. 22, the coronavirus has been confirmed in 146,663 people across the country.
CBC News has dug deep into the data collected by the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) to examine how COVID-19, the illness caused by the virus, affects the young, the elderly, men and women in order to better understand what's most likely to land you in hospital — or worse.
 

Now a post-tropical storm, Teddy lands in Nova Scotia

Teddy has arrived in Nova Scotia as a post-tropical storm, bringing plenty of wind and rain for the province on Wednesday.
It made landfall in the Sheet Harbour area on the province's Eastern Shore around 7:30 a.m.
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How Ontario could slow its growth in COVID-19 cases

With Ontario reporting its highest daily number of COVID-19 cases since early May, there are mounting calls for the government to take more actions to slow the spread of the virus now, in an effort to avoid a full-scale lockdown later.
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Post-tropical storm Teddy hits Nova Scotia without lasting damage

The former hurricane Teddy arrived in Nova Scotia as a post-tropical storm on Wednesday morning, bringing plenty of wind and rain for the province but paling in comparison to infamous past storms.
It made landfall in the Sheet Harbour area on the province's Eastern Shore around 7:30 a.m.
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How COVID-19 worsens Canada's digital divide

Chawathil First Nation lies just 600 metres north of the Trans-Canada Highway in southwestern B.C., but it feels much more remote when you try to log onto the internet from here.
That's apparent when, from behind a Plexiglas barrier at the band office, finance manager Peter John attempts to run an online speed test to measure the dial-up connection.
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Lights, camera, action: Low COVID numbers in N.S. create boom in film industry

Nova Scotia's film industry is enjoying a rare boom this fall.
Those in the business give much of the credit to the province's low rate of COVID-19.
More than a dozen large and small productions got started mid-summer and are continuing into the fall.
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Why an old fight over Indigenous fishing rights is heating up again in Nova Scotia

A Mi'kmaw community in Nova Scotia is addressing a decades-old conflict head-on. Last week, the Sipekne'katik First Nation launched its own Mi'kmaq-regulated, rights-based lobster fishery in St. Marys Bay, about 250 kilometres west of Halifax — believed to be the first of its kind in the province.
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The 'sad coincidence' that may have doomed missing Ontario sailor Reginald Fisher

An Ontario woman says she may have seen the distress flares fired by a sailor the night he vanished on Lake Erie. But when she reported the incident to the Canadian Coast Guard, she says she wasn't taken seriously. 
Reginald Fisher, of Dutton, Ont.
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A Mi'kmaw community in Nova Scotia is addressing a decades-old conflict head-on. Last week, the Sipekne'katik First Nation launched its own Mi'kmaq-regulated, rights-based lobster fishery in St. Marys Bay, about 250 kilometres west of Halifax — believed to be the first of its kind in the province.
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Trudeau's televised message challenge: speak to the moment, but set course for future

Prime ministers rarely ask the television networks for time to address the nation, and when they do it is not always for the most serious reasons — forLester B. Pearson in 1968,Paul Martin in 2005 andStephen Harper in 2008, extraordinary appeals were delivered to Canadians only because a minority government was facing possible defeat in the House of Commons.
 

Mi'kmaw community says rights-based fishery regulations rival those of DFO

The First Nation community operating a new, self-regulated lobster fishery in Nova Scotia says its harvesting regulations rival and may even exceed the standards of the Department of Fisheries and Oceans.
"They're pretty much the same regulations when it comes to the [DFO regulated] commercial season," said Brandon Maloney, director of fisheries for Sipekne'katik First Nation, which launched its first Mi'kmaq-regulated fishery in Saulnierville, N.S.
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