Obama condemns Ottawa attacks, pledges solidarity with Canada in call to Harper

U.S. President Barack Obama spoke to Prime Minister Stephen Harper by phone Wednesday, expressing his country’s solidarity with Canada and offering assistance in the wake of the attacks in Ottawa that left one soldier dead Wednesday.

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According to a statement from the White House, Obama condemned the “outrageous attacks” in his phone conversation with Harper. The president was referring to both Wednesday’s shootings on Parliament Hill and the attack on two soldiers in Quebec on Oct. 20.

The president also “reaffirmed the close friendship and alliance between our people,” the White House said.

The two leaders also agreed to “continue co-ordination” between the U.S. and Canadian governments.

As a massive police presence remained on the streets of the nation’s capital on Wednesday afternoon, a source confirmed to CTV News that the “FBI is assisting the case,” but no other details were provided.

A U.S. official said the Department of Homeland Security and U.S. law enforcement are “monitoring the evolving situation” in Ottawa.

FBI spokesperson Paul Bresson said that although there is no indication of a threat to the United States in light of Wednesday’s attacks, the agency is taking certain precautions.

“FBI has reminded our field offices and government partners to remain vigilant in light of recent calls for attacks against government personnel by terrorist groups and like-minded individuals,” Bresson said.



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