Migrant farm workers allege pressure to sign away movement rights amid COVID-19

OTTAWA -- Some temporary foreign workers on Canadian farms are being asked to sign away their right to leave the properties where they’re employed amid the COVID-19 pandemic, according to multiple workers and advocates.

CTV News has obtained a copy of one of these agreements, which asks the employee to allow their employer to “source and provide food provisions” for them -- which the employee will pay for out of their wages.

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