U.S. Twitter users offer reasons why they could never be Canadian

U.S. Republic presidential hopeful Donald Trump's rise from fringe candidate to favourite has created a surge in Americans who are interested in immigrating to Canada to seek refuge should he be elected to the White House.

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But on Saturday, Americans used the tongue-in-cheek hashtag #WhyICouldNeverBeCanadian on Twitter to express why life wouldn't necessarily be better on the other side of the border.

Many voiced their concerns over the Canadian winter.

#WhyICouldNeverBeCanadian This is the way they take selfies pic.twitter.com/Mq1xZpChkd

— Lou is one (@AngryDolphinFan) March 6, 2016

#WhyICouldNeverBeCanadian despite our best efforts, global warming has only reduced their snowfall by 40% @TagUsOutpic.twitter.com/RUyUwNEovl

— Can't Drive 4.5 (@jdwilkinsonii) March 6, 2016

Others grumbled about peameal bacon, better known as Canadian bacon in the U.S.

#WhyICouldNeverBeCanadian

Their "bacon" is just ham. pic.twitter.com/dorPQYFdRK

— McNeil (@Reflog_18) March 5, 2016

#WhyICouldNeverBeCanadian because Canadian bacon isn't really bacon! pic.twitter.com/Q4sEmJWHgR

— Jaguarjin (@jaguarjin) March 5, 2016

Some Twitter users also sarcastically complained about Canada's "good" health care, and effective gun control.

I hate good health care, nice people and free hugs... #WhyICouldNeverBeCanadian

— Devin (@dgsabraw) March 6, 2016

Americans' interest in immigrating to Canada has been spiking of late. Data obtained by CTV News earlier this week showed that more than 15,000 visits to Citizenship and Immigration Canada’s website were recorded from American internet providers between 9 p.m. and 11 p.m. as primary election results rolled in on Super Tuesday. That dwarfs the 4,400 that were recorded during the same time period, one week earlier on Tuesday, Feb. 23.

N.S. native Rob Calabrese also launched the website "Cape Breton if Donald Trump Wins" earlier this month, which invites Americans to take refuge in Cape Breton should Trump win his party’s candidacy and be elected to the White House.

Calabrese told CTV News last week that the site has already had 600,000 unique visitors. The website also attracted the attention of a CNN crew, which profiled the island earlier this week.



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