Democrats living in Canada prepare to cast ballots on Super Tuesday

While Democrats living outside the U.S. are closely watching the race between presidential hopefuls Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders, they'll still have a chance to cast ballots for their preferred candidates during the Super Tuesday primary elections.

See Full Article

The organization Democrats Abroad is setting up voting stations in more than 40 countries today, including Canada.

Two American citizens living in Toronto spoke to CTV's Canada AM to talk about who they're supporting, and what they think about the presidential race so far.

Bennett Moase, a dual citizen, said he's supporting Hillary Clinton because of her wide breadth of experience.

Clinton has worked as a lawyer, served as the former first lady, was a senator for New York, and served as secretary of state from 2009 to 2013.

Her wide-ranging presidential campaign pledges to raise incomes for the middle-class, reduce students' debt burden, strengthen gun laws, and work on comprehensive immigration reform.

Moase said he believes Clinton is the ideal person to continue building on the work accomplished by President Barack Obama.

"Hillary is the best candidate to continue the advances and the achievements of the Obama administration," he said.

John Martin, a permanent resident living in Canada, said while he respects Clinton, he feels more drawn to the campaign Sanders has mounted.

"I like Hillary, but I love Bernie," he said.

Martin said the 74-year-old Senator from Vermont has instilled a real "progressive voice" in the party, and has opened up a "really good" dialogue for Democrats moving forward.

Sanders has campaigned on a platform that focuses on wealth re-distribution and income inequality, getting corporate and special interests out of the political system, and reducing students' debt burden.

At first seen as a longshot against Clinton, Sanders has surprised critics by staying competitive in the race, even winning the New Hampshire primary.

Both Martin and Moase agree that this year's race, in which Donald Trump leads the Republican candidates, has been more polarized than past presidential campaigns.

"It's definitely more interesting," Martin said, noting the divisive tone of the rhetoric. "People are becoming more conservative. And, with the Bernie supporters, (they're also) becoming more progressive. I don't think that's a bad thing."

Moase said no matter who you support, it’s important to get out and vote.

He noted that there have been past electoral races where voters from abroad helped decide the winner.

“We have a lot of American citizens here in Canada who vote from abroad, and every vote does count,” he said. “I’ve always voted in U.S. elections, and I think it’s an important right that I have that I exercise on a regular basis.”



Advertisements

Latest Canada & World News

  • Raqqa residents trapped by militants ahead of assault

    World News CTV News
    BEIRUT -- As U.S.-backed forces bear down on the de facto capital of the Islamic State group, the militants have taken their strategy of hiding behind civilians further than ever before, effectively using the entire population of Raqqa as human shields. Source
  • 'How dare you say these hateful things?' Woman takes on Islamophobia at school board meeting

    Canada News CBC News
    A Toronto area woman who confronted a group of people shouting Islamophobic comments at a Peel District School Board meeting told CBC News that the energy in the room that night was "explosive" and "sick." Christina Dixon, who grew up in the Peel Region and has a child who goes to school in the district, can be seen in videos of last Wednesday's meeting standing and shouting "Shame on you!" at a man who is ripping pages out of a Qur'an. Source
  • Trudeau government's vacant appointments backlog up 80%

    Canada News CBC News
    Five months after Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's government assured Canadians that its new system would soon fix the backlog of appointments that need to be filled, the problem has gotten much worse. An analysis by CBC News reveals that one in three governor in council positions — ranging from directors of government agencies to members of tribunals that hear appeals of employment insurance or pension disputes — is currently vacant or occupied by an appointee whose term is past its expiry…
  • Byelection performance can be predictive of future results

    Canada News CBC News
    After the votes are counted in Monday's five federal byelections, only the parties that make gains will want to talk about the results. The others will point out that byelections are local affairs that tell us nothing about broader national trends; that they don't really matter. Source
  • 'I feel duped': Why bank employees with impressive but misleading titles could cost you big time

    Canada News CBC News
    Mike Black says he feels "completely betrayed" after trusting RBC employees with impressive-sounding titles to manage his life savings, only to earn far below the market average for six years. "I worked 35 years at two jobs and saved up a considerable amount due to the fact that I didn't have a pension and would need money for retirement," said Black, who managed to put away nearly $1 million. Source
  • Deadline for women to opt out of RCMP sex harassment settlement is today

    Canada News CBC News
    Today is the deadline for female Mounties to decide if they want to opt out of a historic sexual harassment class action lawsuit. Any woman who has worked as a civilian or regular member of the RCMP is eligible to file a claim under the negotiated settlement to compensate for on-the-job harassment and abuse. Source
  • Canada and U.S. on diverging tracks as Trump signs climate order: Don Pittis

    Canada News CBC News
    Only six months ago, Canada and the United States seemed like trains on the same track. Sure, there were policy differences. But especially after the election of a Liberal government in Ottawa, the two capitals were generally agreed on climate change, free trade, immigration, taxes, bank regulation and many other issues. Source
  • Identity of mysterious men, missing kids explored in laundry chute death inquest

    Canada News CBC News
    The forensic pathologist who conducted the autopsy on Nadine Machiskinic said her injuries indicate she went down a Regina hotel laundry chute one of two ways – either feet first or head first while on her back. Source
  • Fear on the farm: In Vermont, migrant dairy workers and their bosses worry about Trump

    World News CBC News
    The milk parlour inside a dairy farm in central Vermont is a frenzy of activity. The sound of hooves on the concrete floor mixes with the clang of pumps and hoses as farm workers hurry to milk this batch of cows before the next cycles through. Source
  • GOP infighting stalled health reform: will it stall rest of Trump agenda?

    World News CTV News
    WASHINGTON -- In the screams of a right-wing radio host came the faint whisper of a fractured political coalition. "Lie after lie, year after year, election after election," Mark Levin shouted this week, in one of his inimitable radio rants. Source