Woman nearly loses Tims prize after posting photo of winning cup online

A Newfoundland woman nearly lost her $100 "Roll Up the Rim" prize after it was claimed by someone who saw a photo of the winning cup that she posted to Facebook.

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Tim Hortons said it will still honour her prize, and is now investigating the incident.

Margaret Coward, of Conception Bay South, N.L., said someone claimed her $100 Tim Hortons gift card before she could, after she posted a photo of her winning rim online.

As of Monday, a Tim Hortons customer service manager contacted Coward to let her know that they would still honour her prize, and that the company would be investigating the incident.

“He was very nice and he listened to the recordings from Friday when I contacted them just after I won and was trying to redeem it online,” Coward told CTVNews.ca in a message.

However, Coward says she still wants to warn other customers.

"Moral of the story, never post your winning Tim's cup on Facebook," she wrote in a Facebook post on Friday. "Someone used my PIN Code that fast and claimed my prize."

Coward said someone who had seen the photo on Facebook claimed the prize online within 30 minutes of her winning it. She said that person used the PIN number on the cup’s rim to claim the prize.

When Coward contacted Tim Hortons, she said the company wouldn’t disclose the person’s email address due to privacy laws.

"Goes to show you that you always need to be careful of what you're posting and taking pictures of," she wrote on Facebook. "Something I so excitedly and innocently posted… always a lesson to learn, even at my age."

She said she wasn't aware that some of the “Roll Up the Rim to Win” prizes could be redeemed online, and she wants other customers to learn from her mistake.

"I think people should be aware that since some prizes can be redeemed online that they not share their winnings until they've redeemed their prize," she wrote. "Hopefully it doesn't happen to anyone else."

She also said she's upset that it was likely a Facebook friend that "betrayed" her, and tried to steal her gift card.

In an email to CTVNews.ca, Tim Hortons Director of Communications Jodi Bond said the company introduced the PIN code feature to allow winners the chance to collect their $100 TimCard prize online.

“As these are unique PIN codes, we do not encourage our guests to post images of their tabs on social media until they have redeemed their prize,” Bond said.



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