Major storm system in forecast, from Ont. to N.L.

A number of special weather statements remain in effect as a storm system developing in the southern U.S. is expected to bring "significant" rain, snow, ice pellets and freezing rain to Ontario, Quebec and the Maritimes.

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Environment Canada said the low pressure system emerging over Texas on Tuesday, is expected to intensify into a winter storm as it heads north towards the Great Lakes on Wednesday.

The storm is expected to bring up to 30 mm of rain or substantial snow to some areas.

Environment Canada is warning that up to 30 cm of snow is "quite likely" in communities north of Toronto including Barrie, Orillia and Midland, where winter storm watches are in effect.

The agency said the areas that will be hit with the heaviest rain and snow will depend on the storm's track, which remains uncertain.

"Travelling conditions are expected to quickly deteriorate Wednesday as the precipitation arrives," Environment Canada said in a special weather statement in effect for Toronto.

In Quebec, snow will begin in the southern parts of the province on Wednesday before spreading northeast. Over southern Quebec, the snow is expected to change to freezing rain by the afternoon and then change to rain by the evening.

In New Brunswick, snow is expected to change to freezing rain by Wednesday afternoon and then change into rain on Wednesday night and into Thursday morning, where it’s expected to continue for much of the day.

Rain is expected to hit Nova Scotia for much of Wednesday and Environment Canada says some parts of the province could see up to 50 mm of rain on Thursday.

In Labrador, the storm system could produce significant snowfall, blowing snow and strong winds beginning Thursday evening and heading into Friday.



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