Questions raised about how Pickton's manuscript was smuggled out of prison

Questions are being raised about how a manuscript penned by serial killer Robert Pickton was smuggled outside a maximum security British Columbia prison.

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The 144-page book, entitled "Pickton: In his Own Words" is available for sale online, and gives a glimpse into the mind of Canada's most notorious serial killer.

In 2007, Pickton was convicted of six counts of second-degree murder and is serving a life sentence in Kent Institution in Agassiz, B.C.

The remains or DNA of 33 women were found on his Port Coquitlam farm. He also confessed to an undercover police officer that he had murdered 49 women -- many of them sex workers from Vancouver's Downtown Eastside -- but had fallen short of an even 50 because he got "sloppy."

In the book, Pickton claims he is innocent.

Author Stevie Cameron extensively followed the Pickton case and wrote the book "On the Farm: Robert William Pickton and the Tragic Story of Vancouver's Missing Women." She said she found it "very weird" that a hand-written manuscript of the book managed to make its way outside of the prison.

Pickton appears to have passed the manuscript to a former cellmate.

That inmate then sent the manuscript to a friend -- a retired construction worker from California named Michael Chilldres -- who typed it up and is credited as the author of the book.

Cameron, who is currently working on a book about the former maximum-security Kingston Penitentiary, said inmates' correspondences are closely monitored by prison guards.

“Any letter I wrote (to) a prisoner was read (by the guards), any letter they wrote me was read," Cameron told CTV's Canada AM on Monday. "I just wonder, how did that manuscript get out of that prison?"

Cameron said the guards likely knew about Pickton's friendship with his former cellmate.

"Didn’t they search the man's bags before he left?" she asked. "They must have seen Pickton scribbling away."

The $20 book is currently for sale on Amazon.ca.

The B.C. provincial government has reportedly asked Amazon to stop selling the book.



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