RCMP association calls for overhaul after latest sexual harassment allegations

A group vying to become the Mounties' first bargaining unit is using new allegations of sex harassment and bullying to try to make its case for a group to represent rank and file officers.

See Full Article

A representative for the Mounted Police Professional Association said the RCMP is mismanaged, and higher-ups turn a blind eye to allegations of harassment and assault in the workplace.

Rob Creasser points to a media report last week detailing allegations of unwanted sexual touching, bullying and rampant nudity in the workplace at the explosives training unit of the Canadian Police College in Ottawa.

The report prompted a sharp reaction from Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale. He said he told RCMP Commissioner Bob Paulson he expects a comprehensive, transparent investigation, strong discipline, support for victims and a plan to end what he calls "this toxic workplace behaviour."

Creasser said the allegations show RCMP officers need an association to encourage transparency and accountability in the force.

He said, as it stands, managers choose people they want to bring into their ranks, and do whatever they can to protect those people.

"I've heard it referred to as an 'old boys club'. Like, you support people that you want to support, and if something comes up that is a little hinky with one of your 'chosen', you do everything in your power to make that go away," the now-retired Mountie said.

He said he'd witnessed as much in his 28 years with the force.

"We can't continue to count on people at the top of the organization to change the organization," he said. "They have a vested interest in the status quo and keeping the amount of power that they have. The type of transformational change that we're talking about is going to be driven from the ground up."

The RCMP did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

"The cultural problem is that the people at the top don't realize it's a cultural problem, because they want to keep things the same," Creasser said. "They want to blame the odd bad apple. And how's that working?"



Advertisements

Latest Canada & World News

  • Demand across Canada outpaces supply for solar eclipse glasses

    Canada News CTV News
    TORONTO - Ali Van Orman is still looking for specialized glasses to protect her family's eyes during Monday's solar eclipse because she never counted on demand totally eclipsing supply. She tried to buy a coveted pair of solar eclipse glasses for herself and two children from Amazon back in July, but the hot commodities wouldn't have arrived in time. Source
  • Skeptics dismiss Bannon's call for economic war with China

    World News CTV News
    WASHINGTON - White House adviser Steve Bannon isn't alone in pondering America's possibly generation-defining question about China's emerging superpower status - but his call for an "economic war" puts him far outside the mainstream. In an interview reflecting on some of his big-thinking projects, Bannon said the country should be "maniacally focused" on a confrontation with Beijing over who will be the global "hegemon" of the next 25 to 30 years. Source
  • U.S. general pledges to defend Japan from North Korea

    World News CTV News
    TOKYO - America's top military official reiterated Friday his country's pledge to defend Japan against a North Korean missile attack, as western Japan carried out a test of an emergency alert system. "I think we made it clear to North Korea and anyone else in the region that an attack on one is an attack on both of us," Joseph Dunford, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said in Tokyo. Source
  • U.S. Navy captain in charge of USS Fitzgerald during collision to lose command

    World News CTV News
    WASHINGTON - Poor seamanship and flaws in keeping watch contributed to a collision between a Navy destroyer and a commercial container ship that killed seven sailors, Navy officials said, announcing that the warship captain will be relieved of command and more than a dozen other sailors will be punished. Source
  • Threat looms of more mudslides in Sierra Leone amid burials

    World News CTV News
    FREETOWN, Sierra Leone - The president joined with families in paying final respects Thursday to victims of this week's mudslides and flooding in Sierra Leone's capital, while the government warned residents to evacuate a mountainside where a large crack opened. Source
  • More than 400 killed in Sierra Leone mudslides, UN says

    World News CTV News
    FREETOWN, Sierra Leone - The United Nations says the death toll from Sierra Leone's mudslides is now above 400. The UN humanitarian agency says 409 bodies have been found after flooding and mudslides in the West African nation's capital of Freetown on Monday morning. Source
  • Suspects with bomb belts killed in Cambrils after Barcelona terror attack, police say [Photos] [Video]

    World News Toronto Sun
    BARCELONA, Spain — A white van jumped the sidewalk Thursday in Barcelona’s historic Las Ramblas district, crashing into a summer crowd of residents and tourists and injuring several people, police said. In a photograph shown by public broadcaster RTVE, three people were lying on the ground in the street of the northern Spanish city Thursday afternoon, apparently being helped by police and others. Source
  • Father charged in baby boy's fatal OD

    World News CTV News
    HAMILTON, Ohio -- An Ohio man has been charged in the fatal drug overdose of his 1-year-old son. Thirty-three-year-old Dorrico Brown, of Trenton, Ohio, was jailed Wednesday on charges of involuntary manslaughter and child endangering in the death of Dorrico Brown Jr. Source
  • 'I know how powerful hate is' — A one-time Canadian neo-Nazi speaks out on Charlottesville

    Canada News Toronto Sun
    It has been 10 years since Elizabeth Moore has spoken publicly about her years as the pretty, public face of Canada’s neo-Nazi Heritage Front. Then came Charlottesville. “I know what these people are feeling. I know how powerful hate is,” Moore says from her Toronto home. Source
  • U.S. helping clear 'historic' amount of explosives in Mosul

    World News CTV News
    BAGHDAD -- The wires protruding from the small, misshapen stuffed animal revealed the deadly booby-trap tucked inside. For the people of Mosul, the sophisticated bomb was a reminder of how difficult it will be to return to homes littered with hidden explosives by Islamic State militants and dotted with the remnants of undetonated bombs dropped by the U.S. Source