Dirt biker tells Tim Bosma's murder trial he found incinerator on accused's farm

HAMILTON -- A motorbike rider told the trial of Tim Bosma's accused killers on Wednesday that he saw an incinerator emblazoned with the word "eliminator" on a farm owned by one of the accused four days after the Hamilton man disappeared.

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Chaz Main told jurors he was riding his bike on May 10, 2013, when he came across a "big redneck smoker" on a property in Ayr, Ont., that was owned by Dellen Millard.

Millard, of Toronto, and Mark Smich, of Oakville, Ont., have pleaded not guilty to first-degree murder in Bosma's death.

Bosma disappeared on the night of May 6, 2013, after taking two strangers on a test drive of a black Dodge Ram pickup truck he was trying to sell.

His body was found more than a week later burned beyond recognition. The Crown alleges Bosma was shot inside his truck and later his body was burned in an incinerator.

Main said the incinerator was on a heavy duty trailer with a large propane tank. It was so unique, he testified, that he had to take a photograph so his friends would believe what he found.

Court saw that photograph, which shows the word "eliminator" in red letters on the black machine.

Main testified that he returned to the sprawling farm near Waterloo the next day for more riding when he was stopped by police officers scouring the property as they searched for Bosma.

"I told them about very odd activity and a big redneck smoker in the woods and an excavator in the swamp," Main said.

Sgt. Michael Benjamin Adams, meantime, testified he was on Millard's farm that day executing three search warrants in an effort to find Bosma, his belongings and his truck. Millard was arrested a day earlier.

Main said after speaking with Adams, he rode his dirtbike back to the tree stand to show the officers the incinerator. On his way, he came across several large "burn spots" where the ground had been scorched. He said he had never seen the incinerator before and it wasn't there two days prior.

He also told police about an excavator and a "skid steer" that was stuck in a swamp on another part of the property.

Under cross-examination from Millard's lawyer, Nadir Sachak, Main said those two machines had been on the farm since the previous winter and appeared to have become stuck in the swamp.



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