Inquiry must go beyond official tally of missing, murdered women: Bennett

OTTAWA -- Indigenous Affairs Minister Carolyn Bennett says the examination of violence against aboriginal women must go beyond the murdered and missing.

See Full Article

Bennett says a specific count of victims doesn't capture the true number of aboriginal families in Canada that have been affected by violence.

Bennett made headlines Monday when she said the number of missing and murdered women is likely much higher than the 1,200 put forward in reports by the RCMP.

She says it is important to hear from survivors in the inquiry process, such as those who managed to escape from convicted killer Robert Pickton's farm in British Columbia.

The minister also says she's heard about some cases that were wrongly classified as suicides, such as when someone was found shot in the back of the head or with their arms tied behind their back.

Bennett says she does not have data to indicate how big the problem is, but says ministers have heard enough anecdotal evidence to believe the depth and breadth of the tragedy is greater than anticipated.



Advertisements

Latest Canada & World News

  • Iran's supreme leader says 'no talks with U.S. at any level'

    World News CBC News
    Iran's supreme leader announced on Tuesday that "there will be no talks with the U.S. at any level" — remarks apparently meant to end all speculation about a possible U.S.-Iran meeting between the two countries' presidents at the UN later this month. Source
  • Hidden asbestos: Hundreds of homes in Peterborough, Ont., suspected of containing toxic material from GE plant

    Canada News CBC News
    When Ernie Farris walked past his childhood home in Peterborough, Ont., this summer for the first time in years, he had an alarming thought. In the late 1940s, as a young teen, he had helped his father unload a truck full of fluffy, white scrap asbestos from the local General Electric factory, spreading it in the family's attic as cheap insulation. Source
  • Green leader gets stuck in the sands of World War II history

    Canada News CBC News
    Elizabeth May is an expert on climate change and the environment. She has a law degree from Dalhousie University. And for a time, she studied theology at St. Paul's University in Ottawa with an eye to becoming an Anglican priest. Source
  • New giant salamander species now the world's largest amphibian

    World News CBC News
    Scientists have discovered a new species of giant salamander and concluded that the largest amphibian ever recorded was a member of that species. For a long time, scientists thought all Chinese giant salamanders belonged to a single species, Andrias davidianus. Source
  • Is there a way out for Hong Kong? Not likely, as protesters become more inflamed

    World News CBC News
    After more than 100 days of protest, Hong Kong is one bitter place. Anger and resentment hang in the air and explode on the streets almost daily now. And not just outside the legislature and other symbols of a deeply unpopular government. Source
  • Bernier's in — and the federal election debates just got less predictable

    Canada News CBC News
    The stage is set for Maxime Bernier. His challenge now is to perform. The leader of the nascent People's Party of Canada (PPC) yesterday got his coveted invitation to take part in the two televised debates organized by the independent Leaders' Debate Commission. Source
  • Israelis vote in repeat election centred on Netanyahu

    World News CBC News
    Israelis began voting Tuesday in an unprecedented repeat election that will decide whether longtime Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu stays in power despite a looming indictment on corruption charges. Netanyahu, the longest serving leader in Israeli history, is seeking a fourth consecutive term in office, and fifth overall. Source
  • Police respond to reports of shooting at Calgary area mall

    Canada News CBC News
    Airdrie RCMP and Calgary police are on scene at CrossIron Mills mall after RCMP received reports of shots fired at the mall at approximately 7:11 p.m. One male has been injured and the suspect is still at large. Source
  • Taiwan says Solomon Islands switches recognition to China

    World News CTV News
    TAIPEI, Taiwan -- The Solomon Islands switched diplomatic recognition from Taiwan to China on Monday, becoming the latest country to leave the dwindling Taiwanese camp. Taiwan's Foreign Ministry confirmed the move, saying the Solomon Islands Cabinet approved a resolution to recognize Beijing as the government of China. Source
  • White House orders two former aides to defy House subpoenas

    World News CTV News
    WASHINGTON -- The White House has instructed two former aides to U.S. President Donald Trump not to appear at a House Judiciary Committee hearing Tuesday, saying Rick Dearborn and Rob Porter are "absolutely immune" from testifying at what the panel is calling its first impeachment hearing. Source