Even a ski hill is closed as storm lands on East Coast

HALIFAX -- It was a familiar story Monday in Atlantic Canada as a nasty storm grounded flights and prompted schools, shops, offices -- and even a ski hill -- to shut early.

See Full Article

Nova Scotia was expected bear the brunt of the storm -- the third to hit the East Coast in just over a week -- with up to 30 centimetres of snow expected by Tuesday.

Environment Canada said parts of Newfoundland should brace for 15 to 25 centimetres of snow and near-zero visibility. Blowing snow was also expected to cause trouble in Prince Edward Island and southern New Brunswick.

Though travellers at the Halifax Stanfield International Airport were likely dismayed by the slew of cancellations in and out of the city, the storm prompted guarded optimism, and caution, at snow-starved ski resorts.

Andy MacLean, the general manager of Ski Martock near Windsor, N.S., said in an interview the forecast was dire enough to plan a closure at 4 p.m. on Monday.

"We decided to close so staff don't have to travel back and forth," he said. "It's safety first for staff and patrons."

However, after a winter with relatively warm temperatures that has made snowmaking difficult, MacLean said the resort couldn't wait for the heavy snowfall.

"We love it when nature provides a good dump of snow like this," he said.

One Halifax inn hoped to lure storm-stranded guests with a discounted rate and free snacks. The Atlantica Hotel tweeted it was offering a special, $89-plus-tax rate that "includes your own bag of .StormChips!"

Most school boards in the province announced school closures due to concerns the strong winds and snow would make driving dangerous, and the province said offices in Halifax and across the southwest of the province closed at noon.

Halifax Regional Police used social media to urge caution on the roads.

"You know the drill, people," the force said on Twitter. "It's about to get all kinds of nasty out there. Let's slow down, be cautious and get home safe."

Bay Ferries also announced it was cancelling crossings between New Brunswick and Nova Scotia due to the weather. The St. John's International Airport had a number of cancellations, mostly flights to Halifax.

Nova Scotia Power issued a news release saying it would have a full complement of crews and trucks placed strategically across the province and would begin any needed repairs as soon as conditions were safe.

The utility said 67,000 customers lost power at the height of a storm that hit the last weekend of January after snow and ice covered trees made contact with and downed power lines.

"Temperatures are expected to be colder for this storm ... so the snow is not expected to be as sticky," it said. "This should result in less extensive build-up of snow and ice on trees and electrical equipment. However, strong winds could blow trees and branches onto lines, causing outages."

A second winter system was expected to impact Newfoundland on Tuesday night and into Wednesday with additional snowfall and strong winds.



Advertisements

Latest Canada & World News

  • Libraries in Canada hit by wave of hate, threats, as right-wing groups protest all-age drag events

    Canada News CBC News
    Family-friendly drag events across Canada, many hosted by municipal libraries, have been targeted by a deluge of hateful comments and threats during Pride month, prompting multiple police investigations and renewed concerns about the safety of the LGBTQ community. Source
  • The pandemic upset how we assess students. Experts worry that's also hampered recovery efforts

    Canada News CBC News
    Some young learners are struggling to build early reading skills while others stumble over math concepts. Repeated pandemic pivots have left students out of practice with classroom learning, impacted their mental health and distanced them from peers. Source
  • Canada can now seize, sell off Russian assets. What's next?

    Canada News CBC News
    Selling Russian-owned assets to pay for Ukraine's reconstruction may sound like a logical approach to restitution, but as the Canadian government gains new powers to begin this process, questions remain about how it will work, and whether some issues are headed to court. Source
  • Parents, caregivers face new juggling act as employers evaluate work-from-home policies

    Canada News CBC News
    There's no daily commute for Amy McQuaid-England these days. That's because she's advising clients on social media matters from her home in Brighton, Ont., without having to cross her doorstep. The communications professional said this "life-changing" style of flexible work allows her to manage the needs of her young family while also managing her business. Source
  • Zelensky expected to ask for more support in address to G7 leaders

    World News CBC News
    The ongoing war in Ukraine will move from being an distant conflict to something more tangible for the leaders of the world's seven wealthiest democracies on Monday with an address by the embattled country's president. Volodymyr Zelensky said he's going to tell G7 leaders that despite their efforts to arms his country and to isolate the regime of Russia President Vladimir Putin, more needs to be done — and fast. Source
  • Connecting Indigenous inmates to their culture: Grand Chief performs at Manitoba prison

    Canada News CTV News
    Behind prison walls, National Indigenous People’s Day was celebrated this month, with inmates at a Manitoba federal prison granted access to music, drumming and sharing circles — positive steps forward to reconnect Indigenous inmates with their culture and rehabilitate a group that is incarcerated at a disproportionate rate. Source
  • Infrastructure fixes to halt floods on Peguis First Nation sorely needed, emergency head says

    Canada News CBC News
    All levels of government need to come together to help solve flood-related infrastructure issues on Manitoba's largest First Nation, the community's director of emergency management says. "There is serious work to do," said William Sutherland in an interview Sunday, as the flood-battered community north of Winnipeg was toiling to again try and shore up structures, roads and homes on Peguis First Nation as water levels rise from recent rainfall. Source
  • Infrastructure fixes to halt floods on Peguis First Nation sorely needed, leaders say

    Canada News CBC News
    All levels of government need to come together to help solve flood-related infrastructure issues on Manitoba's largest First Nation, the community's director of emergency management says. "There is serious work to do," said William Sutherland in an interview Sunday, as the flood-battered community north of Winnipeg was toiling to again try and shore up structures, roads and homes on Peguis First Nation as water levels rise from recent rainfall. Source
  • Lawyer releases pages from Brian Laundrie's notebook in which he admits to killing Gabby Petito

    World News CTV News
    WARNING: This story contains details that may be disturbing The attorney for the family of Brian Laundrie on Friday released eight pages from Laundrie's notebook that was found near his remains in Florida in October last year, according to a news release obtained by CNN affiliate WINK. Source
  • Pride marked by celebrations, arrests and grief around the world

    Canada News CBC News
    After a pandemic hiatus, Pride events returned to many cities around the world on Sunday. Streets were once again filled with celebrations and parades, but many others were held under drastically different moods. Here's a look at how Pride was marked around the world: Source