$7M Vancouver tear-down proof of housing crisis, protesters say

Plans to demolish a multimillion-dollar Vancouver home sparked protests on Sunday, with critics calling the tear-down a symbol of the city's "housing crisis.

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Located in Vancouver's residential Shaughnessy area, the 2,225-square-metre (7,300-square-foot) home is less than 20 years old, and recently underwent renovations.

Between its prime location and the structure itself, the home is currently valued at approximately $7 million, according to a City of Vancouver property inquiry.

But, despite its mint condition and spacious interior, the owners have filed an application with the city to demolish the property and build a new home in its place.

On Sunday, dozens of protesters armed with picket signs gathered around the home to speak out against the plan.

"This is about the common good," Bev Watt told CTV Vancouver. "It's about the environment. It's about waste."

Those attending the rally said the home is just one example of the issues plaguing Vancouver's pricey housing market.

"It's greed. It's money," Watt said.

City Councillor Adriane Carr also spoke at the protest, where she called for changes to zoning bylaws.

"You're talking about a city that's in a housing crisis, where homes are being torn down, monster homes built, staying empty, and all of that escalates the prices," Carr said. "This is a crisis in Vancouver."

Not everybody agrees, however.

Some other Shaughnessy residents said they believed the homeowner should have a right to demolish or build on their own private property.

"I generally believe that people should be able to build a home that suits them," Richard Younker, who also lives in the area, said.

"I think that, if people have the money and the wherewithal to want to change a home, that they be able to do so."

With files from CTV Vancouver



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