Tim Bosma trial: Man testifies Millard wanted truck repainted quickly

A man who works in the auto body industry told a Hamilton, Ont. court on Monday that Dellen Millard asked him to quickly repaint a truck from black to red.

See Full Article

Tony DiCiano is the latest witness to testify at the murder trial of the men accused of killing Tim Bosma.

Millard, 30, of Toronto and Mark Smich, 28, from Oakville, Ont., have pleaded not guilty to first-degree murder charges in Bosma’s death.

Bosma disappeared on the night of May 6, 2013 after taking two strangers on a test drive of a black Dodge Ram 3500 pickup truck he was trying to sell online. His body was found about a week later burned beyond recognition.

DiCiano testified that he's known Millard for seven to 10 years.

He said in May 2013 Millard had asked him to repaint a truck from black to red.

"He wanted it in a rush, he wanted it done right away," DiCiano said.

DiCiano said he asked Millard if he wanted anything done with the truck's interior, and Millard told him he had already stripped the inside of the truck.

DiCiano said Millard ended up cancelling the paint job with the auto body shop's manager.

The trial entered its second week on Monday with the cross-examination of a man who provided police with an important tip in the case.

Earlier in the day, Millard's lawyer continued the cross-examination of Igor Tumanenko, a man who told the court last week about a May 5, 2013 test drive two men took in his pickup truck that was similar to the one Bosma was trying to sell.

Smich has admitted to being in the vehicle that day.

Tumanenko said he remembered seeing the word "ambition" tattooed on the wrist of one of the men who was on the test drive. One of the officers investigating Bosma’s disappearance testified that the tip led to a breakthrough in the case.

Millard has a similar tattoo on his wrist.

On Monday, Tumanenko testified that he didn't ask about the tattoo because he thought it was too personal of a question.



Advertisements

Latest Canada & World News

  • Pints poured, unkempt hairdos cut as England eases lockdown

    World News CTV News
    LONDON -- The pints are being poured and the unkempt hairdos are being cut and styled as England embarks Saturday on its biggest lockdown easing yet. In addition to the reopening of much of the hospitality sector, including pubs and restaurants, for the first time in more than three months, couples can tie the knot once again and people can go and see a movie at the cinema. Source
  • U.S. envoy forges ahead with troubled Taliban peace deal

    World News CTV News
    ISLAMABAD -- Washington's envoy to Afghanistan stressed Saturday the economic benefits of the peace deal with the Taliban, forging ahead with an agreement that has run into new political obstacles both in the U.S. and regionally. Source
  • 2 women hit by car on Seattle highway closed amid protests

    World News CBC News
    Two women were struck by a car whose driver sped through a protest-related closure on a highway in Seattle, authorities said early Saturday. One suffered life-threatening injuries and the other had serious injuries, Washington State Patrol spokesperson Trooper Rick Johnson tweeted. Source
  • 7 police hurt in violence at unlicensed London music event

    World News CBC News
    Seven police officials were injured in violence at an unlicensed musical event in the British capital as they sought to break up a crowd that posed a risk to public health during the coronavirus pandemic, police said on Saturday. Source
  • Scuba diver killed in Australia shark attack

    World News CBC News
    A 20-year-old scuba diver died Saturday after being attacked by a shark off the coast of Australia's Queensland state, authorities said. The man was attacked at around 2 p.m. near Fraser Island. Paramedics who arrived by helicopter provided emergency treatment, but the man, who had been bitten around the legs, could not be saved and died at the scene, said the Queensland Ambulance Service. Source
  • Pandemic stimulus could be a game changer for climate goals — if focus switches from fossil fuels, say some

    World News CBC News
    The economic repercussions of the COVID-19 pandemic have forced governments around the world to resort to massive spending in order to calm the nerves of people and businesses alike. But one question has been troubling many economists and environmental advocates: Will stimulus plans help move the world toward a cleaner, greener future or will they largely maintain the status quo, which includes protecting the interests of fossil fuel industries? Source
  • Trump's enthusiasm advantage meets fear and loathing on the campaign trail

    World News CBC News
    If there was any doubt that June was a miserable month for Donald Trump — thousands more COVID-19 deaths, racial strife, tumbling support in the polls — his campaign manager appeared only to confirm it with an op-ed in the Washington Post this week that gamely tried to argue the president's re-election prospects aren't as bad as they plainly are. Source
  • 'I don't want to hold on to hatred': B.C. woman seeks to forgive hit-and-run driver who left her for dead

    Canada News CBC News
    In the years since a hit-and-run driver left Patricia Anne Peters for dead on a highway north of Whistler, B.C., in the middle of an October night, she has faced plenty of hard choices. Stay angry at a stranger who left her in a wheelchair or try to be positive. Source
  • Karina Roman: Parents, provinces call on Ottawa to help ensure schools open in the fall

    Canada News CBC News
    Children, Families and Social Development Minister Ahmed Hussen says that while he understands the burden working parents have been carrying for months since schools closed due to the pandemic, Ottawa's ability to help provinces fully reopen their schools this fall is limited. Source
  • Walking a 'tightrope': Bill Morneau and the path out of the pandemic economy

    Canada News CBC News
    Now comes the hard part. Finance Minister Bill Morneau has, in the space of a few months, approved the spending of nearly $200 billion in federal aid in a deliberate effort to shut down huge portions of Canadian society so that a contagious disease could be contained. Source