Plan to dry American falls at Niagara could benefit Canadian tourism

NIAGARA FALLS, Ont. - A plan that could see the American side of Niagara Falls go dry for a short period of time to rebuild two bridges might be a boon to Canadian tourism.

See Full Article

New York State Parks has put forth three proposals to replace two bridges to Goat Island - and two of those proposals recommend stopping the flow of water for five to nine months.

New York State Parks spokesman Randy Simons says the proposal they are recommending would leave the falls dry from September to April, but it wouldn't happen until 2019 at the earliest and they still need funding.

Niagara Parks Commission chair Janice Thomson says the dry rock wall would attract tourists like a nearly frozen falls did two years ago.

Both Thomson and Simons say the project will have little effect on the environment and a nesting pair of falcons that live on the gorge will be fine.

Ontario Power Generation, which helps control the flow of water over the falls along with its American counterparts, says it won't result in more power for Canada because the turbines are upriver of the falls.

Simons called the dry falls "a once-in-a-lifetime" event "because beyond fixing these bridges, there is no reason to dewater the falls."

A 131-page report on the designs, along with a drawings was presented to the public Wednesday night in Niagara Falls, N.Y.

"The meeting went great," Simons said. "People love the idea to fix the bridges - there was no real opposition."

The bridges to Goat Island were built in 1901 and needed extensive repairs in 2004, Simons said, but the plan was to find a permanent fix.

The proposal the park is recommending involves concrete archways that mimic the original bridges.

Engineers would dry the falls for construction by installing a temporary dam - called a cofferdam - just upstream of the island.

The water would then be funnelled down the Horseshoe Falls on the Canadian side.

The drying process would be similar to the situation in 1969 when U.S. Army Corps of Engineers shut off flow on the American side to examine the stability of the area.

Both Thomson and Simons say that thousands of tourists came out to check out the dry falls then, too.



Advertisements

Latest Canada & World News

  • Trump recounts minute-by-minute details of Soleimani strike to donors at Mar-a-Lago

    World News CTV News
    U.S. President Trump recounted minute-by-minute details of the strike that killed Iran's top military commander during remarks to high-dollar Republican donors at his South Florida estate, according to audio obtained by CNN. Trump, speaking at a GOP fundraising dinner Friday evening, offered new details about the strike that killed Gen. Source
  • Thousands gather for Women's March rallies across the U.S.

    World News CTV News
    WASHINGTON -- Thousands gathered in cities across the country Saturday as part of the nationwide Women's March rallies focused on issues such as climate change, pay equity, reproductive rights and immigration. Hundred showed up in New York City and thousands in Washington, D.C. Source
  • House Dems to outline case for removing Trump from office

    World News CTV News
    WASHINGTON -- House Democrats were preparing to outline their case for removing U.S. President Donald Trump from office in a legal brief due Saturday, as opposing sides in the impeachment case look ahead to the opening of the historic trial in the Senate. Source
  • More than 150 injured after police, protesters clash in Lebanon's capital

    World News CBC News
    Riot police fired tear gas and sprayed water cannons near parliament in Lebanon's capital Saturday to disperse thousands of protesters after riots broke out during a march against the ruling elite amid a severe economic crisis. Source
  • Lebanon police fire tear gas, water cannons at protesters amid Beirut riots

    World News CBC News
    Riot police fired tear gas and sprayed water cannons near parliament in Lebanon's capital Saturday to disperse thousands of protesters after riots broke out during a march against the ruling elite amid a severe economic crisis. Source
  • Prince Harry and Meghan give up royal titles, public funding

    World News CBC News
    Prince Harry and Meghan, the Duke and Duchess of Sussex, will no longer be working members of the Royal Family and will, therefore, no longer use their royal titles or taxpayer money, according to a statement from Buckingham Palace released Saturday. Source
  • Prince Harry and Meghan will give up royal titles, public funding

    World News CBC News
    Prince Harry and Meghan, the Duke and Duchess of Sussex, will no longer be working members of the Royal Family and will, therefore, no longer use their royal titles or taxpayer money, according to a statement from Buckingham Palace released Saturday. Source
  • Harry and Meghan will no longer use royal titles, receive public funds for duties

    World News CTV News
    TORONTO -- Harry and Meghan will no longer use their "royal highness" titles or receive public funds for royal duties, Buckingham Palace announced Saturday.Sign up for our Royal Dispatch newsletter for all the latest Royal news Source
  • Prince Harry, Meghan will no longer use 'royal highness' titles

    World News CTV News
    TORONTO -- v> Prince Harry and Meghan will no longer use their 'royal highness' titles or receive public funds for royal duties, Buckingham Palace announced Saturday.Sign up for our Royal Dispatch newsletter for all the latest Royal news Source
  • Protests close Louvre museum in Paris amid pension strikes

    World News CBC News
    Dozens of protesters blocked the entrance to the Louvre museum and forced the famous Paris landmark to close Friday while they denounced the French government's plans to overhaul the pension system. Protesters later chased down President Emmanuel Macron at an evening theatre performance in northern Paris. Source