'This is it': Passenger describes turbulent plane ride

ST. JOHN'S, N.L. -- Seven people were taken to hospital after an American Airlines passenger jet was diverted to St.

See Full Article

John's, N.L., due to severe turbulence.

American flight 206 left Miami bound for Milan, but was re-routed to St. John's International Airport late Sunday. Passenger Gustavo Canga, 26, was on his way to his job in aviation services at a military base in Abu Dhabi after spending time in the United States, where he has an infant son. Here is his account of the incident, as told to reporter Michael Tutton of The Canadian Press:

When I saw this plane my first impression was that it could be a rough flight. I know the smaller planes, when they hit turbulence you feel it harder than the Airbus.

But I just wanted to get back to Abu Dhabi and work. I'm very familiar with aviation and I fly all the time.

I was sitting about three quarters of the way towards the back. We started turbulence anywhere from two to three hours after we left Miami.

About 30 minutes before the turbulence, the flight attendance started to serve food. They had to cut it short and had to get people's trash. The seatbelt signs came on.

We had turbulence, and it was progressively getting (worse). Then there was a drop, or a dip, and that was when the flight attendants that had no seatbelts got hurt.

Some people passed out. There was a lady who had a cut on her face.

It's hard to track time when you're that nervous and you're scared and you might think it was longer than what it was. I had to say (all of) the turbulence had to be 10 to 20 minutes; I'm not exactly sure.

The turbulence that caused the injuries had to be in the seconds. It was really fast. Yet it felt very long because you are in a panic mode.

It was definitely a life-changing experience. You realize when something like this happens that things can end very quick and really nothing matters.

I was praying. You realize, this can be it right here. I tried to remain calm. But you can't help but think, "This is it." It was just praying to God.

I didn't see (the attendants) being injured. But I did hear the one flight attendant who spoke on the speaker. You could hear the panic in her voice. She was very frightened.

She told people to remain in their seat. Don't get up for any reason. Put your seatbelt on.

There were so many things going on. There were people talking, people screaming, and one of the flight attendants called for medical personnel to come to the back.

The woman sitting in the row next to me was a pediatrician from Venezuela.

When she returned to her seat she was calm. From what the doctor told me, one of the flight attendants had a deep cut in their leg and they applied a tourniquet on the leg.

The doctor told me the First Aid kit in the plane had very basic stuff. It didn't have anything to treat severe injuries.

After the turbulence ended, the captain announced we were going to make a stop in St. John's.

As the airplane landed, the first thing I thought was it hadn't snowed too badly. I kind of thought you guys would be buried here. This town looks a bit like northern New Jersey.

I work in aviation and I would say that the plane should now be thoroughly inspected, especially before going across the Atlantic.

I just don't want to get in the plane anymore, to be honest. I have a small child, Mikel, who turns six months this month.

I didn't get hurt, but it was definitely a traumatic experience. I slept all right, but I tossed and turned. I woke up in the morning just thinking about it.



Advertisements

Latest Canada & World News

  • Police crack down on protesters in the streets of Myanmar after military takeover

    World News CBC News
    Police in Myanmar launched their most sweeping crackdown in three weeks of protests against military rule on Saturday in towns and cities across the country, with media reports of a woman shot dead and dozens of people detained. Source
  • Trump, idolized in golden statue, dominant force at conservative conference

    World News CTV News
    WASHINGTON -- A conference dedicated to the future of the conservative movement turned into an ode to former U.S. President Donald Trump as speakers declared their fealty to the former president and attendees posed for selfies with a golden statue of his likeness. Source
  • Pandemic leaves tribes without U.S. recognition at higher risk

    World News CTV News
    Rachel Lynne Cushman is used to getting calls from Chinook Nation members worried about losing housing or having their power shut off. Since COVID-19 hit, they come in daily. Cushman is secretary-treasurer for the group of tribes whose rural, ancestral lands are based in one of Washington state's poorest counties. Source
  • Man killed by his own rooster during illegal cockfight in India

    World News CTV News
    NEW DELHI, INDIA -- A rooster fitted with a knife for an illegal cockfight in southern India has killed its owner, sparking a manhunt for the organisers of the event, police said Saturday. The bird had a knife attached to its leg ready to take on an opponent when it inflicted serious injuries to the man's groin as it tried to escape, officers said. Source
  • Quebec marks one-year anniversary of first case by reporting 858 new COVID-19 infections

    Canada News CTV News
    MONTREAL -- One year after the first COVID-19 case was reported in Quebec on Feb. 27, 2020, the province has now reported 287,003 total cases after it added 858 in the past 24 hours on Saturday. Source
  • Texas jail inmates hungry, shivering during unusual freeze

    World News CTV News
    AUSTIN, TEXAS -- When an unusually heavy winter storm blanketed much of Texas with snow, knocking out electricity to millions of homes and leaving many struggling to find clean water, one sector of the population was particularly vulnerable: inmates at the state's largest county jail. Source
  • Trump supporters who breached U.S. Capitol: 'It was not Antifa'

    World News CTV News
    Nearly a dozen Trump supporters charged in connection with the U.S. Capitol insurrection have said that Antifa and other left-wing groups weren't involved in the attack, debunking a false-flag conspiracy theory that is gaining popularity in the pro-Trump orbit. Source
  • 'We need this:' Getting COVID-19 vaccine to remote and urban Indigenous populations

    Canada News CTV News
    Chief Chris Moonias looked into a web camera as he prepared to get a COVID-19 vaccine just after precious doses arrived in his northern Ontario community. "I'm coming to you live from Neskantaga First Nation community centre where our vaccines will be administered," a jovial Moonias, wearing a blue disposable mask, said during a Facebook live video at the start of February. Source
  • Ontario reports more than 1,100 new COVID-19 cases, 16 additional deaths

    Canada News CTV News
    TORONTO -- More than 1,100 new cases of COVID-19 were reported in Ontario Saturday. The 1,185 infections mark a slight decrease from Friday’s total when 1,258 cases were logged. Before the release of Saturday’s report, new COVID-19 cases in the province had been increasing daily over the past four days. Source
  • Myanmar ambassador to the United Nations has been fired: state TV

    World News CTV News
    Myanmar's U.N. Ambassador Kyaw Moe Tun has been fired, state television said on Saturday, a day after he urged the United Nations to use "any means necessary" to reverse the Feb. 1 military coup. Kyaw Moe Tun had told the U.N. Source