Ontario, B.C., Quebec, Manitoba earn top marks on history education report card

TORONTO -- The majority of Canada's provinces and territories have been assigned high marks on a new report card on history education.

See Full Article

Historica Canada looked at both social studies and history curricula from grades 7 through 12 across the country.

Ontario, British Columbia, Quebec and Manitoba topped the provincial rankings in the Canadian History Report Card, with each earning A- grades. Among the territories, Yukon was assigned A-, ahead of the Northwest Territories and Nunavut which both got B-minus.

It's a vast improvement from the 2009 report card, which focused solely on history courses offered from grades 9 through 12. Four provinces were assigned an "F" and none receiving an "A."

Evaluations were conducted for three main factors: curriculum content; development of critical and creative thinking skills; and the amount of mandatory Canadian history content at junior, intermediate and senior levels.

The report card noted that curricula changes in recent years "have demonstrated the need to better incorporate diverse perspectives," such as those focused on indigenous peoples, gender and women's history, and multiculturalism.

It also outlines recommendations for further improvements, such as mandating at least one Canadian history credit as a high school graduation requirement, and establishing a clear balance between national and provincial/regional history.

Here is the overview of final grades and percentages:

1. Ontario, A-, 82 per cent

2. British Columbia, A-, 81 per cent

3. (tie) Quebec, A-, 80 per cent

3. (tie) Manitoba, A-, 80 per cent

5. Newfoundland and Labrador, B, 75 per cent (anglophone) 74 per cent (francophone)

6. Nova Scotia, B-, 73 per cent (anglophone) 72 per cent (francophone)

7. New Brunswick, B-, 71 per cent (anglophone) 71 per cent (francophone)

8. Prince Edward Island B-, 71 per cent (anglophone) 70 per cent (francophone)

9. Saskatchewan, C+, 69 per cent

10. Alberta, C-, 62 per cent

1. Yukon, A-, 81 per cent

2. (tie) Northwest Territories, B-, 72 per cent

2. (tie) Nunavut, B-, 72 per cent



Advertisements

Latest Canada & World News

  • Giant rabbit said to be 'fit as a fiddle' dies aboard United flight from London to Chicago

    World News Toronto Sun
    LONDON — United Airlines is investigating a report that a giant rabbit died on one of its trans-Atlantic flights. Distraught breeder Annette Edwards from Worcestershire in central England told The Associated Press by phone Wednesday that Simon, a 10-month-old, 3-foot (meter) -long continental rabbit, had a vet check shortly before travelling from London’s Heathrow airport to Chicago’s O’Hare airport. Source
  • Crane climber in Toronto rescued, arrested [Photos]

    Canada News Toronto Sun
    TORONTO — Some streets in Toronto’s downtown core were closed early Wednesday as dozens of construction workers and commuters gazed skyward to watch police and firefighters try to rescue a woman who got stuck atop a tall construction crane during the night. Source
  • Questions persist in death of prominent New York judge

    World News CTV News
    NEW YORK -- When Sheila Abdus-Salaam agreed to speak this month at an alumni gathering at Columbia Law School, it was business as usual for someone in demand as the first black woman to serve on New York's highest court. Source
  • Mounties suspect 2 government officials leaked classified shipbuilding information

    Canada News CBC News
    Royal Canadian Navy Vice-Admiral Mark Norman (left) speaks with Vice-Admiral Ron Lloyd during a change of command ceremony, Thursday, June 23, 2016 in Ottawa. (Adrian Wyld/Canadian Press) The RCMP are accusing the military's second-in-command of passing cabinet secrets to a Quebec shipping executive in a cozy relationship meant to advance a navy project he "personally" favoured, according to a newly unsealed search warrant. Source
  • 'Mistakes happen': How 'miscalculation' could spark a U.S.-North Korea conflict

    World News CBC News
    Despite heightened tensions, many experts say it's unlikely the U.S. and North Korea are headed toward imminent military conflict. While the leaders of both countries are impulsive and unpredictable, they are also desperate to avoid pre-emptive strikes. Source
  • Pie, tart shells from Edmonton bakery recalled nationally due to E. coli scare

    Canada News CBC News
    Various brands of pie and tart shells that were sold across Canada are being recalled due to E. coli fears. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency says the shells were produced by Edmonton-based Harlan Bakeries. The Deep Dish Pie Shells, Sweetened Tart Shells and Tart Shells are sold under the Great Value, Apple Valley, Western Family and No Name brands. Source
  • United investigates report that giant rabbit died on flight

    World News CTV News
    LONDON -- United Airlines is investigating a report that a giant rabbit died on one of its trans-Atlantic flights. Distraught breeder Annette Edwards from Worcestershire in central England told The Associated Press by phone Wednesday that Simon, a 10-month-old, metre-long continental rabbit, had a vet check shortly before travelling from London's Heathrow airport to Chicago's O'Hare airport. Source
  • Death of giant rabbit adds to United Airlines woes

    World News CTV News
    LONDON -- United Airlines is investigating the death of a giant rabbit on one its trans-Atlantic flights, adding to a growing list of customer complaints for the U.S. carrier. Distraught breeder Annette Edwards told The Associated Press by phone Wednesday that a veterinarian checked Simon, a 10-month-old, 3-foot (meter)-long continental rabbit, shortly before the animal was put on a flight from London's Heathrow airport to Chicago's O'Hare. Source
  • Five facts about the crane rescue operation in Toronto

    Canada News CTV News
    TORONTO -- A rescue operation was conducted in downtown Toronto on Wednesday morning after a woman became stuck atop a pulley device swinging from a tall crane. Here are five things to know about the rescue. Source
  • 'Very, very great': Trump's speaking style still flummoxes linguists

    World News CTV News
    NEW YORK -- Campaign promises may have been reshaped and some self-imposed deadlines reset. But among the things kept intact in the opening months of the new administration is the unmistakably distinct style of U.S. Source