Moncton shootings: RCMP hearing on labour code charges delayed

MONCTON, N.B. -- The Crown and defence have asked for more time to prepare a case on alleged Canada Labour Code violations by the RCMP related to the force's response to a June 2014 shooting rampage in Moncton, N.B.

See Full Article

Defence lawyer Mark Ertel of Ottawa told the court that the defence has given the federal Crown a list of changes to the statement of facts and both sides need time in an effort to narrow the issues in the complex case.

"It's a big, serious case," he later told reporters outside the court.

It's the latest in a string of delays dating back to July 2015.

Ertel told Provincial Court Judge Anne Dugas-Horsman that they hope to reach some agreements because a trial would take months to prosecute and defend.

Federal Crown prosecutor Paul Adams agreed and stated that the charges are indictable.

Employment and Social Development Canada alleges there were four violations of the code relating to the force's equipment, training and supervision in the June 4, 2014 incident that resulted in the deaths of three Mounties.

Justin Bourque shot and killed constables Doug Larche, Fabrice Gevaudan and Dave Ross, while constables Eric Dubois and Darlene Goguen were wounded.

He was captured following a 30-hour manhunt.

Bourque was sentenced to life in prison with no eligibility for parole after pleading guilty to three counts of first-degree murder and two counts of attempted murder.

An RCMP review of the shootings said responding officers faced a litany of problems that included communicating accurate information, accessing high-powered weaponry and securing protective equipment.

In May of last year, the Public Prosecution Service of Canada recommended the RCMP be prosecuted for contravention of the occupational health and safety provisions of Part II of the Canada Labour Code.

The charges allege the RCMP failed to provide members with appropriate equipment, information, instruction and training in an active shooter event, and failed to provide supervisors with appropriate information and instruction or training in an active shooter event.

A final charge alleges the force failed to ensure in general, the health and safety of its members.

The defence has elected to have the case tried in provincial court and a pretrial conference is set for April 7.

"We'll be discussing issues and seeing if we can narrow issues and keep the case moving," Ertel said.

However he wouldn't say if that could result in a reduction of the number of charges.

"We're really not at that stage yet. The matter is before the court and we have to let things unfold in court the way they will," he said.

Ertel said a plea will be entered on April 7 and a trial date will be set.



Advertisements

Latest Canada & World News

  • Ontario to call public inquiry into Elizabeth Wettlaufer murders

    Canada News CTV News
    TORONTO -- The case of a nurse who murdered eight seniors in long-term care homes in Ontario will be examined in a public inquiry. The Ontario government announced Monday it is moving to appoint a commissioner to lead a public inquiry into the circumstances of the deaths. Source
  • Canadian English accent surprisingly uniform coast to coast: researchers

    Canada News CTV News
    VANCOUVER -- Celebrations across Canada this weekend may look different from one community to the next, but for most of the country it will all sound the same. Derek Denis, a post-doctoral researcher of linguistics at the University of Victoria, said more than just the stereotypical "eh?" unites Canadians. Source
  • Arkansas fugitive recaptured after 32 years on the run

    World News Toronto Sun
    LITTLE ROCK, Ark. — The mother of an Arkansas prison escapee who had been on the run for more than three decades said she has been in contact with her son since soon after his escape and that he was visiting her when he was arrested. Source
  • Personal chemistry key as Trump meets India PM for first time

    World News CTV News
    WASHINGTON -- President Donald Trump meets for the first time Monday with India's Prime Minister Narendra Modi, and personal chemistry as much as policy could determine the direction of future relations. The leaders of the world's two largest democracies will convene at the White House. Source
  • Subway digging unearths 'Mini-Pompeii' in Rome

    World News Toronto Sun
    ROME — Digging for Rome’s new subway has unearthed the charred ruins of an early 3rd-century building and the 1,800-year-old skeleton of a crouching dog that apparently perished in the same blaze that collapsed the structure. Archaeologists on Monday said they made the discovery on May 23 while examining a 10-meter (33-foot) -deep hole bored near the ancient Aurelian Walls as part of construction work for the Metro C line. Source
  • Class of one: Nova Scotia teen is the only graduate at his high school

    Canada News CTV News
    He’s already been named valedictorian with the highest grades in his year and he stands a pretty good chance of being crowned king at his school’s prom. In fact, he may just be eligible to win every award at his graduation. Source
  • Trump awaits big meeting with Putin

    World News Toronto Sun
    WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump is eager to meet Russian President Vladimir Putin with full diplomatic bells and whistles when the two are in Germany for a multinational summit next month. But the idea is exposing deep divisions within the administration on the best way to approach Moscow in the midst of an ongoing investigation into Russian meddling in the U.S. Source
  • Girl's actions caused her to fall from NY park ride, police say

    World News CTV News
    QUEENSBURY, N.Y. -- As authorities tried to determine exactly how a 14-year-old Delaware girl managed to fall from a New York amusement park ride, one industry expert said even the strictest safety guidelines won't prevent accidents if customers don't follow the rules. Source
  • Professor who backed black-only Memorial Day celebration on Fox News fired by Essex County College

    World News Toronto Sun
    A mouthy college professor who was fired last week after making a litany of outrageous statements on live TV compared her removal from Essex County College to a “public lynching.” Lisa Durden, a former communications professor at the New Jersey-based institution, was dismissed following a controversial appearance on Fox News' Tucker Carlson Tonight. Source
  • Donald Trump: SCOTUS' travel ban decision 'clear victory' for national security

    World News Toronto Sun
    WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court of the United States is letting a limited version of President Donald Trump’s ban on travel from six mostly Muslim countries take effect, a victory for Trump in the biggest legal controversy of his young presidency. Source