'We wouldn't be sitting here': Family credits crying baby for saving lives

A B.C. family is warning others to make sure their home has a working carbon-monoxide detector after a near-deadly experience they survived, thanks to a crying baby.

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Monique Ruppel was woken up on Jan. 15, by the sounds of her fifteen-month-old daughter Celia crying and screaming.

Monique says, when she went to check on her baby, she immediately knew something was wrong.

"I only made it a few feet and vertigo just took over and I fell back down onto the bed," she told CTV Vancouver.

Her husband Kyle says he also felt unwell as he walked around the house, raising his suspicions.

When she was able to gather herself and check on Celia, the danger of the situation hit Monique.

"She just starts vomiting all over me, and at the same time I look down and my cat was passed out on the floor so I became hysterical and we knew something was really wrong."

In a Facebook post, Monique says the family of three was airlifted to Vancouver General Hospital to be treated for carbon monoxide poisoning.

All three are expected to make a full recovery.

The Ruppels didn't have a carbon monoxide detector at the time, despite detectors being mandatory across the province in homes with fuel burning appliances, and rescue officials say it's part of a larger trend across the province.

"I'd bet you three quarters of [homes] don't have them," said Rick Euper, Kelowna fire chief.

The Ruppels say they're just grateful their daughter's crying, which can lead to sleepless nights, saved their lives.

"If she hadn't cried at that moment, we wouldn't be sitting here today," Monique said.

They've since installed carbon monoxide detectors throughout their home.

With a report from CTV Vancouver



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