Canada officially welcomes first 10,000 Syrian refugees

Canada has officially welcomed its first 10,000 Syrian refugees, marking a much-talked-about milestone in the federal government's plan to accept tens of thousands of refugees to the country.

See Full Article

The pledge was a key plank in the Liberal Party's campaign last fall, but repeated delays have pushed the deadlines back.

Originally, the government pledged to bring 25,000 refugees in by the end of 2015.

That goal was later adjusted to 10,000 refugees by the end of the year. And as that deadline closed in, the government pushed the promise back again, citing problems with poor flying weather as well as other circumstances.

On January 1, The Canadian Press reported that 6,064 refugees had arrived under the Liberal commitment, in addition to 1,263 who'd been settled under the previous Conservative Government.

On Wednesday, the government announced "a significant milestone" had been reached late Tuesday evening.

"Canada has now welcomed more than 10,000 Syrian refugees to our country," a government statement said.

In the press release, Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship John McCallum commended the many Canadians who have helped bring over the refugees.

"Many people have worked day and night to bring these refugees to Canada – and Canadians have opened their communities and their hearts to welcome them," McCallum said. "Canada continues to set an international example with its response to the worst refugee crisis of our time."

Since coming to power, the Liberal government has worked closely with the United Nations to help resettle refugees living in settlements in Jordan, Lebanon and Turkey.

Private sponsors, religious organizations, cultural groups and other ordinary Canadians have also pitched in to welcome the refugees, supply housing and donate warm clothing and toys.

The government now has a month and a half to reach its next target: bringing in a total of 25,000 refugees by the end of February.

With files from the Canadian Press



Advertisements

Latest Canada & World News

  • What are prop guns and how are they dangerous? Alec Baldwin incident raises concerns

    World News CTV News
    TORONTO -- Firearms experts say it is rare for someone to be killed from a prop gun while filming a movie or TV show as a weapons master or armourer is mandated to be on set to ensure everyone's safety, in addition to providing rigorous training and gun handling to actors beforehand. Source
  • Not the time to 'freely go wherever,' says Tam as non-essential travel advisory lifts

    Canada News CTV News
    OTTAWA -- Canadians should carefully weigh any future decisions on taking foreign trips even though the federal government has lifted a global advisory asking them to avoid non-essential travel, health officials cautioned Friday. Dr. Theresa Tam, Canada's chief public health officer, said the government would be providing more specific information about the severity of COVID-19 in various countries to help Canadians decide where they should consider travelling. Source
  • U.S. Supreme Court doesn't block Texas abortion law, sets hearing

    World News CTV News
    WASHINGTON -- The U.S. Supreme Court is not immediately blocking the Texas law that bans most abortions, but has agreed to hear arguments in the case in early November. The justices said Friday they will decide whether the federal government has the right to sue over the law. Source
  • Health-care worker fired for drinking can't challenge termination using Human Rights Code: Supreme Court

    Canada News CBC News
    A Manitoba health-care worker who was fired from her job for drinking alcohol cannot challenge her termination under her province's Human Rights Code, the Supreme Court of Canada has ruled. The ruling sided with the employer's argument that disputes between a unionized employee and an employer on an issue covered by a collective agreement, can only be settled by a labour arbitrator working with both parties. Source
  • Youth arrested in fatal stabbing of Montreal teen boy outside his school

    Canada News CTV News
    MONTREAL -- Montreal police have made an arrest into the stabbing death of a 16-year-old boy outside his school on Monday. In a news release issued at noon Friday, police said they arrested a youth and say that he is expected to be charged with second-degree murder and conspiracy. Source
  • Ontario's COVID-19 case counts expected to remain stable as long as public health measures are not lifted

    Canada News CTV News
    TORONTO -- Ontario's daily COVID-19 case counts are expected to remain stable over the next month despite an increase in social contacts, newly released modelling shows, but only if public health measures are not lifted. The new data was released by the province's Science Advisory Table late Friday morning. Source
  • Sen. Josée Forest-Niesing hospitalized in Sudbury, Ont., for COVID-19

    Canada News CBC News
    Sen. Josée Forest-Niesing of Sudbury is in hospital in the northern Ontario city for COVID-19. Forest-Niesing, 56, is double vaccinated and was admitted to Health Sciences North in the northern city, her office said. No one in her family has tested positive for COVID-19, a statement said, adding it's uncertain how she was exposed to the virus. Source
  • Robert Durst charged with 1982 murder of wife Kathie Durst

    World News CTV News
    NEW YORK -- Millionaire real estate scion Robert Durst has been charged in suburban New York City with the death of his former wife, Kathie Durst, who vanished in 1982, authorities confirmed Friday. A state police investigator filed a criminal complaint on Tuesday at a town court in Lewisboro, New York, accusing Durst of second-degree murder. Source
  • Two men arrested in death of Prabhjot Singh Katri in Truro, NS.: Police

    Canada News CTV News
    HALIFAX - Police in Truro, N.S. have arrested two men in relation to the homicide investigation of Prabhjot Singh Katri last month. On Thursday, officers say they arrested Dylan Robert MacDonald, 21, of Valley, Colchester County, N.S. Source
  • Elephants without tusks evolve quickly due to ivory poachers

    World News CBC News
    A hefty set of tusks is usually an advantage for elephants, allowing them to dig for water, strip bark for food and joust with other elephants. But during episodes of intense ivory poaching, those big incisors become a liability. Source