'What we grew up doing': Alta. couple rejects fine for rink on frozen pond

An Edmonton couple is refusing to accept the $100 penalty handed to them on New Year’s Eve for making use of the frozen pond behind their home.

See Full Article

Brian and Morgann Tomlinson say they plan to fight the $100 ticket they received when a peace officer interrupted their skating party to cite them for “modifying land that could cause risk of injury.”

The Tomlinsons had cleared off and flooded a portion of the ice on Poplar Lake to create an outdoor rink for their children and neighbours to skate on. It’s a tradition they’ve held for several years, but now, the city has told them it’s not safe.

The lake is fenced off to the public, with signs posted around it reading “KEEP OFF – DANGER – Unknown ice conditions.” However, Morgann Tomlinson says she was not aware it was illegal to build rinks on the ice. “I can’t believe they didn’t give us a warning,” she told CTV Edmonton. She added that she and her husband plan to fight their ticket, and will push the city to clarify its signage to make it clear that a bylaw prohibits skating in certain areas.

“We would never put our friends or family at risk at all,” Brian Tomlinson said. “Checking the depth of the ice, we found it was safe enough.”

The Edmonton couple are avid hockey fans who chose to live near Poplar Lake, in part, because it was a great location to build an outdoor rink in the winter. “This is what we grew up doing, playing hockey on ponds and rinks and having fun,” Brian Tomlinson said.

Morgann Tomlinson said she’s seen other rinks in the area built next to the city’s “keep off” signs, so she thought they were just suggestions – not lawful notices. “I don’t think anyone is obeying those signs. So I thought it meant ‘At your discretion,’” she said.

The city of Edmonton permits skating on stormwater lakes “when conditions allow.” The city’s website lists all stormwater lake locations, and includes a message in bold saying “Please obey all posted signs.”

Poplar Lake is considered a “stormwater-influenced wetland,” and is not included on Edmonton’s list of stormwater lake locations, according to the city’s website.

Morgann Tomlinson expressed her frustration with the law in post to her Facebook page on Wednesday. The post shows two men and two children playing hockey on the pond, with the reeds of Poplar Lake in the background.

“Sorry kids, not this year,” Tomlinson wrote.

Sorry kids, not this year

Posted by Morgann Tomlinson on Wednesday, January 6, 2016

With files from CTV Edmonton



Advertisements

Latest Canada & World News

  • Royal Caribbean announces nine-month world cruise

    World News CTV News
    It would've been unthinkable 12 months ago as the cruise industry reeled from the effects of COVID, but one operator is now offering an epic new voyage that will last nine months and take travelers to more than 150 destinations. Source
  • EU unconvinced by Polish arguments on rule of law changes

    World News CTV News
    BRUSSELS -- Polish arguments that fundamental judicial changes the country has made would not undermine the European Union on Friday failed to convince key bloc leaders who said that the withholding of billions in EU recovery funds would likely continue unless Warsaw falls back into line. Source
  • Crown contemplating charges in toppling of statues at Manitoba legislature

    Canada News CTV News
    Winnipeg - The Winnipeg Police Service has sent the findings of its investigation into the toppling of two statues on the Manitoba legislative grounds on Canada Day to the Crown attorney’s office to determine if charges will be laid. Source
  • U.S. Supreme Court will hear challenge to Texas ban on most abortions, but law remains in effect

    World News CBC News
    The U.S. Supreme Court on Friday agreed to hear a challenge by President Joe Biden's administration and abortion providers to a restrictive Texas law that imposes a near-total ban on abortion, and set the date for arguments in the case for Nov. Source
  • Luxembourg to become first country in Europe to legalize cannabis

    World News CTV News
    Luxembourg is set to become the first European nation to legalize the growing and use of cannabis, the government announced in a statement on Friday. Under the new legislation, adults over 18 in Luxembourg will be allowed to use cannabis, and to grow up to four plants per household, which would make it the first country in Europe to fully legalize the production and consumption of the drug. Source
  • Appeal for B.C. woman convicted in 8-year-old daughter's death dismissed

    Canada News CTV News
    Warning: Disturbing content. VANCOUVER -- The appeal of a B.C. mother convicted of second-degree murder in the death of an eight-year-old girl has been dismissed. Lisa Batstone learned the decision Friday relating to the suffocating death of her daughter, Teagan. Source
  • What are prop guns and how are they dangerous? Alec Baldwin incident raises concerns

    World News CTV News
    TORONTO -- Firearms experts say it is rare for someone to be killed from a prop gun while filming a movie or TV show as a weapons master or armourer is mandated to be on set to ensure everyone's safety, in addition to providing rigorous training and gun handling to actors beforehand. Source
  • Not the time to 'freely go wherever,' says Tam as non-essential travel advisory lifts

    Canada News CTV News
    OTTAWA -- Canadians should carefully weigh any future decisions on taking foreign trips even though the federal government has lifted a global advisory asking them to avoid non-essential travel, health officials cautioned Friday. Dr. Theresa Tam, Canada's chief public health officer, said the government would be providing more specific information about the severity of COVID-19 in various countries to help Canadians decide where they should consider travelling. Source
  • U.S. Supreme Court doesn't block Texas abortion law, sets hearing

    World News CTV News
    WASHINGTON -- The U.S. Supreme Court is not immediately blocking the Texas law that bans most abortions, but has agreed to hear arguments in the case in early November. The justices said Friday they will decide whether the federal government has the right to sue over the law. Source
  • Health-care worker fired for drinking can't challenge termination using Human Rights Code: Supreme Court

    Canada News CBC News
    A Manitoba health-care worker who was fired from her job for drinking alcohol cannot challenge her termination under her province's Human Rights Code, the Supreme Court of Canada has ruled. The ruling sided with the employer's argument that disputes between a unionized employee and an employer on an issue covered by a collective agreement, can only be settled by a labour arbitrator working with both parties. Source