Navy finds five more breaches of secure network at N.S. training school

HALIFAX -- In the wake of the revelation of a large breach of information at the military's East Coast intelligence Centre, the navy's commander in the region now says there have been five more breaches of a secure military computer network at Canadian Forces Base Halifax.

See Full Article

In an interview requested by the navy on Thursday, Rear Admiral John Newton said the "non-nefarious breaches" occurred at the navy's training school at the base.

Newton said they were found after the navy began security scans of its system in September. He said those same scans had previously turned up a larger breach of information at the intelligence facility, HMCS Trinity.

He said the latest checks revealed an inappropriate use of information by three instructors and two students at the training school who transferred classified training material from the military's classified network to its unclassified network.

"Therefore I would suspect that the nature of the material on the military unclassified network now are a small group of files related to training of our sailors and how they operate their ships," said Newton.

He said the network scan found that a smaller number of files were involved than in the Trinity case, in which more than 1,000 secret documents were mishandled.

"In one of, less than 10 (files) and it's of that nature," Newton said.

While he classified the latest misuse as "small indiscretions," Newton said the navy views it as a serious matter. He said military police are investigating and so far, no charges have been laid.

The instructors involved have been transferred to an area that doesn't handle secure information, he said, while the students would also face administrative measures pending the outcome of the investigation.

Newton said he's confident the incident was contained within the military because he said its computer network is closed to the public and is not part of the Internet.

"There is no information I have of anything more serious than dealing with human error. Transgressions of moving stuff from one military network to another military network."

He suggested part of the problem may have involved people trying to digest course information in another format because of limited access to restricted computer terminals.

Newton said he's committed to reducing the number of incidents he describes as "background noise" in order to see if there are larger problems with the system.

"I've got to reduce those to zero so I can see people trying to abuse the networks for nefarious intent," he said.

The interview, conducted in Newton's office overlooking the Halifax naval dockyard, followed details of the Trinity breach that emerged on Monday.

A search warrant filed in provincial court by military police alleges that between 2004 and 2009 a web designer used Defence Department networks to improperly store secret files. None of the allegations has been proven in court and so far no charges have been laid.

A serious breach at Trinity in 2012 led to the arrest of Sub-Lt. Jeffrey Paul Delisle, a navy intelligence officer.

Delisle was sentenced to 20 years in prison in February 2013 for copying secret computer files and selling them to Russia.



Advertisements

Latest Canada & World News

  • Jim Carr warns of softwood lumber job losses, says Canada standing by to help

    Canada News Toronto Sun
    OTTAWA - Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says the Canada-U.S. relationship is bigger than any one trade irritant — and that both countries would suffer from a “thickening” border. Trudeau was responding to news that the U.S. Source
  • Bones found in badger hole in Idaho are remains of 2 children

    World News Toronto Sun
    BOISE, IDAHO - The fluke discovery of children’s bones protruding from a badger hole in Idaho has investigators trying to determine if they’re dealing with a double homicide or the disturbed grave of young 19th century emigrants who died going west on the Oregon Trail. Source
  • Timmies torpedoed in British invasion

    World News Toronto Sun
    Iconic Canadian coffee colossus Tim Hortons is being battered like a bag of day-olds on social media as it prepares to enter the British market. The company is opening its first store in Glasgow in May before rolling out stores across the rest of the country. Source
  • Don't take selfies on train tracks, U.S. railroad companies warn teens

    World News CTV News
    RALEIGH, N.C. -- Transportation officials and railroad companies are sounding a warning: Active railroad tracks are a bad backdrop for prom pictures or selfies. With the season for graduations and prom portraits underway, North Carolina's transportation and public school agencies this month are urging high school yearbook staff advisers to reject student photos taken on or near railroad tracks. Source
  • Facebook facing criticism after Thai man murders daughter live

    World News CBC News
    A Thai man filmed himself killing his 11-month-old daughter live and then posted two video clips on Facebook before committing suicide, police said on Tuesday. People could access the videos of the child's murder on her father's Facebook page for roughly 24 hours, until they were taken down around 5 p.m. Source
  • Netflix strikes licensing deal in China

    World News CBC News
    Netflix is making its first big inroads in China through a licensing agreement with local streaming giant iQiyi. The company confirmed the deal to CBC News. It will allow Netflix's original shows to be available in China shortly after the content debuts on Netflix in other regions, Variety reports. Source
  • Former Trump aide Flynn may have broken law, lawmakers say

    World News CTV News
    WASHINGTON -- President Donald Trump's former national security adviser, Michael Flynn, appeared to break U.S. law when he failed to seek permission or inform the government about accepting tens of thousands of dollars from Russian organizations after a trip there in 2015, leaders of a House committee investigating possible Russian ties with the Trump campaign said Tuesday. Source
  • Torrents of juice flood Russian town after factory accident

    World News CTV News
    MOSCOW - A flash flood of fruit juice from a beverage plant in southern Russia has flowed into a town's streets and into the River Don. The Prosecutor's Office in the Lipetsk region said in a statement that the roof of PepsiCo's Lebedyansky factory collapsed Tuesday morning, injuring two people. Source
  • Toronto man faces manslaughter charge in death of 90-year-old hospital resident

    Canada News CTV News
    TORONTO -- Police have laid a manslaughter charge against a man accused of attacking a 90-year-old resident at a Toronto hospital. Investigators say the incident took place in February, when a man at Bridgepoint Health pushed another resident, who fell to the floor and struck her head. Source
  • Bidding tops $125K for Maud Lewis painting found in thrift shop

    Canada News CBC News
    The auction for a Maud Lewis painting found in a New Hamburg thrift shop is less than a week old, but with 26 bids recorded, it's already reached $125,208. The painting, entitled Portrait of Eddie Barnes and Ed Murphy, Lobster Fisherman, Bay View, N.S. Source