Sting on B.C. terror plotters not meant to seem illegal: officer

VANCOUVER -- An undercover terrorism sting involved thousands of dollars changing hands and officers promising access to guns and explosives, but the lead officer told a trial Wednesday that the operation was in no way meant to appear criminal.

See Full Article

RCMP Sgt. Bill Kalkat told B.C. Supreme Court that officers never encouraged John Nuttall to believe he was dealing with criminal elements.

Nuttall and his wife Amanda Korody were found guilty last June of plotting to blow up the B.C. legislature on Canada Day 2013. But the conviction hasn't been entered until a judge decides after this proceeding if police entrapped the pair during the undercover operation.

"We never said we were al-Qaida, or that (the primary undercover officer) was a terrorist," Kalkat told the court.

"Nuttall might infer that it's a criminal organization. I don't know what he's thinking."

Nuttall and Kordy's lawyers are arguing police manipulated them into attempting to carry out the terrorist act.

Early in the undercover operation, Nuttall was paid $200 to take an unmarked package to a transit-station locker in downtown Vancouver.

He was later directed to transport another parcel, this time by taking a circuitous transit route, and leave the package in the trunk of an unlocked rental car. The court heard he was told to wait for further instructions inside a nearby department store.

"Would any of that behaviour be consistent with the notion that the package is legitimate and legal?" asked Korody's lawyer Mark Jette.

Kalkat emphasized that Nuttall was always informed the contents of the packages were legal but admitted it would have been possible to interpret the operations as illegitimate.

Another scenario in the operation involved officers engaging Nuttall in a "loyalty talk" before showing him $20,000 in cash being exchanged between undercover officers.

"I'm going to suggest to you, that you designed it that way because you wanted Nuttall to believe that (the primary undercover officer) was engaged in nefarious, probably illegal activities," said Jette.

"No, not that he's engaged in nefarious activities, but that he does have contacts and that he's engaged in business and that he has a source of income," Kalkat replied.

"We're showing Mr. Nuttall that we also have a sense of security and to some degree a sense of sophistication."

Kalkat also said he "absolutely" urged his officers to consider Nuttall developmentally delayed, telling the court that the police scenarios were designed to take Nuttall's mental capacity into account.



Advertisements

Latest Canada & World News

  • Desert homes threatened by enormous California wildfire

    World News CTV News
    JUNIPER HILLS, CALIF. -- An enormous wildfire that churned through mountains northeast of Los Angeles and into the Mojave Desert was still threatening homes on Monday, but officials said calmer winds could help crews corral the flames. Source
  • 'It happened in a split second': Court documents reveal details in wounding of RCMP officer during N.S. mass shooting

    Canada News CTV News
    HALIFAX -- Court documents released by a judge's order today contain more details surrounding the horrific mass killings that took place in Nova Scotia's Colchester County this past April, including what an injured RCMP officer witnessed as he was approached and shot by the gunman. Source
  • Halifax professor recalls growing up with Belarusian opposition leader

    World News CTV News
    TORONTO -- Pro-democracy protests continue to grip Belarus, and one woman is known around the world for leading the calls for change. Sviatlana Tsikhanouskaya is the country's opposition leader, currently living in exile after violence broke out six weeks ago. Source
  • Public Healthy Agency of Canada gets new president as current one steps down

    Canada News CTV News
    OTTAWA -- The Public Health Agency of Canada is getting a new president as the country heads into the second wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has tapped Iain Stewart, currently head of the National Research Council of Canada, to take over the role. Source
  • CDC removes warning on airborne spread of COVID-19

    World News CBC News
    The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said on Monday it had posted guidance on possible transmission of the new coronavirus through airborne particles in error and it will be updating its recommendations. "A draft version of proposed changes to these recommendations was posted in error to the agency's official website," the CDC said. Source
  • Trudeau taps National Research Council head to lead Public Health Agency of Canada

    Canada News CBC News
    Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has tapped the president of the National Research Council to lead the Public Health Agency of Canada after the abrupt resignation of PHAC's current president last week. Iain Stewart, a long-serving bureaucrat, will assume the role of president of PHAC effective September 28 — giving the agency tasked with coordinating the country's pandemic response a new leader just as caseloads are on the rise in Ontario and Quebec. Source
  • Judge orders U.S. Postal Service to treat all election mail as 1st class or priority

    World News CBC News
    A federal judge on Monday ordered the U.S. Postal Service to expedite all November election mail and to approve additional overtime for postal workers. U.S. District Judge Victor Marrero in Manhattan, N.Y., said the postal service must treat to the extent possible all election mail as first-class mail or priority mail express and "shall pre-approve all overtime that has been or will be requested" between Oct. Source
  • Mali junta names country's post-coup interim leaders

    World News CBC News
    The head of Mali's military junta said Monday he will serve as the vice-president in a transitional government that is supposed to bring about a return to democracy more than a month after a coup. The move is likely to be immediately rejected by the international community, which has called on Mali's junta to restore civilian rule as soon as possible or face additional sanctions. Source
  • B.C. premier expected to announce snap election for Oct. 24

    Canada News CBC News
    British Columbia looks set to be heading to the polls. The B.C. NDP has announced that Premier John Horgan will hold a news conference at 11 a.m. PT, following a meeting with Lt.-Gov. Janet Austin, where he will "address how British Columbians deserve a say in our economic recovery and will decide the future of the province. Source
  • B.C. voters heading to the polls as snap election called for Oct. 24

    Canada News CBC News
    British Columbia looks set to be heading to the polls. The B.C. NDP has announced that Premier John Horgan will hold a news conference at 11 a.m. PT, following a meeting with Lt.-Gov. Janet Austin, where he will "address how British Columbians deserve a say in our economic recovery and will decide the future of the province. Source