New Year's Eve revellers encouraged to be 'alert' at public celebrations

As major cities around the world ramp up security ahead of New Year’s Eve celebrations, Canada’s public safety minister is urging revellers to be “alert and aware” as they ring in 2016 but added that there is no new information to change the nation’s risk assessment.

See Full Article

Following the terror attacks in Paris and San Bernardino, fears of copycat violence are prompting bigger police patrols at some of the world’s largest New Year’s celebrations.

And while Toronto is planning to add extra security to public celebrations in its downtown core, Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale said in a statement to CTV News that Canadian authorities “have no new information that would cause Canada to consider any change in our existing risk assessment.

“But that being said, our security and police authorities are always vigilant and will take all possible steps to keep Canadians safe.”

Many cities are increasing their security patrols ahead of the big party.

Authorities in Brussels say they are not cancelling their New Year’s Eve fireworks show, but would increase security at public celebrations after they foiled a terror plot set to be carried out in the Belgian capital on New Year’s Eve.

Two suspects accused of planning attacks on well-known locations were arrested. Officers seized military clothing and ISIS propaganda but found no weapons.

Much of the Belgian capital is on high alert since the co-ordinated terrorist attacks across Paris in November that left 130 dead, and hundreds injured. The mastermind of the attacks is from Belgium.

In France, which is still reeling from terror attacks, the defence minister visited the troops ahead of New Year’s Eve celebrations, and stressed the need for “special vigilance, full mobilization and a very significant presence” of security forces.

The city of Paris has cancelled its fireworks show and instead will project a video show on the Arc de Triomphe that will be played on big screens on the Champs Elysee avenue.

In Toronto, added security will watch over celebrations at Nathan Phillips Square, even though there is no specific threat.

In New York City, 500 counterterrorism officers will blend into the massive crowd expected to watch the New Year’s ball drop in Times Square.

There is no specific threat in London, U.K. either, but out of an abundance of caution, police are expected to double the number of officers on patrol for New Year’s Eve.

In Las Vegas, where 332,000 are expected to watch fireworks shoot from the rooftops on the Las Vegas Strip and in the city’s downtown, officials are urging revellers to leave bags, backpacks and strollers at home.

The public request comes following deadly U.S. attacks in San Bernardino, Calif., and in Las Vegas itself, where a driver recently plowed into pedestrians on a busy sidewalk, killing one person.

With files from CTV News’ Katie Simpson in London



Advertisements

Latest Canada & World News

  • Legions begin fundraising to save branches as financial challenges mount

    Canada News CTV News
    TORONTO -- A number of Royal Canadian Legion branches across the country have launched online fundraising efforts to keep their doors open after suffering financial setbacks because of COVID-19. The head of the national veterans' and community service group said this week that despite ongoing work to help veterans and seniors in their communities during the pandemic, many branches are now turning to fundraising to pay the bills and ensure they can re-open when the crisis ends. Source
  • COVID-19 sparks rise in online child predators, says UNICEF chief

    World News CTV News
    OTTAWA -- The COVID-19 outbreak has sparked an increase in online child sexual predators that organizations, governments and parents need to take more seriously, says the head of the United Nations children's agency. "We've got a couple of worrying signs, which is that the online predators are really -- they're multiplying," Henrietta Fore, UNICEF's executive director, said in a wide-ranging interview with The Canadian Press this week. Source
  • Liberals asked to help cover overruns on projects delayed by COVID-19

    Canada News CTV News
    OTTAWA -- Cities and construction groups are asking the Trudeau Liberals to relax the rules for expected cost overruns from infrastructure projects facing delays from the COVID-19 pandemic -- or add more cash to help them deal with it. Source
  • Doctors investigate rare COVID-19 symptoms in effort to move quickly from anecdotes to science

    Canada News CBC News
    Dry cough, fever and difficulty breathing are the most common symptoms of COVID-19, but specialists are starting to learn more about less common potential symptoms such as loss of one's sense of smell, disorientation and even seizures. Source
  • Pandemic equipment snarls will rewrite Canada's definition of national security needs, say experts

    Canada News CBC News
    The mad scramble to secure protective medical equipment and ventilators in the midst of a global pandemic has given some of the people who work in the usually tedious world of government procurement an unwelcome excuse to say, "I told you so. Source
  • How a simple plastic box could protect health-care workers across Canada from COVID-19

    Canada News CBC News
    For clinicians, inserting a tube into the airway of a COVID-19 patient is a high-risk procedure. It usually means front-line workers are staring right into someone's open mouth, and directly in the line of fire, should a sudden cough send virus-filled droplets flying. Source
  • Yes, we can have a 'virtual' Parliament — but we shouldn't get used to the idea

    Canada News CBC News
    In any other crisis, it might be reassuring to see that Parliament is still sitting — that the official business of democracy is carrying on undaunted. But in the midst of a global pandemic — when allowing people to come anywhere near each other risks spreading a potentially deadly disease — asking MPs to convene in the House of Commons seems foolish, even dangerous. Source
  • Mushrooms, oregano oil and masks targeted in crackdown on misleading COVID-19 ads

    Canada News CBC News
    A mushroom spray, oil of oregano and a special hat to kill coronavirus in saliva have all been targeted by Health Canada in its crackdown on misleading and false claims of COVID-19 prevention and cures. The federal health agency has in recent weeks fielded dozens of complaints from Canadians reporting advertisements for products that claim to prevent, treat or cure the novel coronavirus that's so far killed more than 80,000 people in a global pandemic. Source
  • How to be a mom when you're in quarantine. Your COVID-19 questions answered

    Canada News CBC News
    We're breaking down what you need to know about the pandemic by answering your questions. You can send us your questions via email at [email protected] and we'll answer as many as we can. We'll publish a selection of answers every weekday on our website, and we're also putting some of your questions to the experts on the air during The National and CBC News Network. Source
  • Number of workers at B.C.'s Site C dam project rises, as some call for shutdown over COVID-19

    Canada News CBC News
    While on-site activity has shut down for all but "essential" workplaces across the country, construction continues at the Site C hydroelectric dam project in northern British Columbia, where nearly 1,000 workers are at camp, including hundreds who were flown in over the past couple of weeks. Source