Return to East Coast from oilpatch a mixture of struggles and fresh starts

TRURO, N.S. - As the days go by with no phone calls offering work in the Alberta oilpatch, Jared Park worries about how he'll pay for his son's leukemia medicine.

See Full Article

"It's a struggle. You don't know when or if you're going to make it back to work. You just hope you get that call," said Park as five-year-old Mason wriggled and bounced on the sofa in his tidy Truro, N.S., bungalow.

"For Mason, it's important because part of our drug plan covers the medicine for his chemotherapy."

The 30-year-old father of three is among a wave of East Coast workers who have returned home from the Western oilfields after a downturn in the economy. Many are hoping for higher hydrocarbon prices and a return to the West in 2016, but others have begun trying to seek a living closer to home.

Kerry Morash, a former provincial cabinet minister, said rural parts of the Maritimes have been hard hit by the fall in the oil prices from about $95US to current levels of less than $40US.

Morash joined the migration west after the paper mill near Liverpool, N.S., where he worked as a health-and-safety consultant closed several years ago. He was hired on contract at the Kearl oilsands project north of Fort McMurray, Alta.

"There wasn't a lot of work back home, and there certainly wasn't a lot around Liverpool ... I was very fortunate to be able to go out there," he said, recalling his two-week shifts of 12 hours per day.

He said some maintenance jobs continue to draw East Coast tradespeople, but since the completion of Kearl, the former Progressive Conservative politician said he couldn't find another oilpatch job despite a resume that included a stint as Nova Scotia's minister of labour and environment.

Gradually, he's starting to hear about opportunities in the rural area of Nova Scotia where he lives. And he said he may be staying on the East Coast.

Some industries in the Maritimes, meanwhile, are using the opportunity to recruit skilled tradespeople to work in their hometowns.

The Halifax shipyard has been recruiting workers from the West as it builds Arctic patrol ships for the federal government.

Spokeswoman Mary Keith said by early December the Halifax site had 33 employees who had been working in Alberta, British Columbia or Saskatchewan.

Some workers are retraining to begin fresh careers that will keep them on the coast.

Twenty-three-year-old Jacob Stepaniak, who grew up in Margaree Valley, N.S., came home from Alberta last year after working intermittently in the West since 2011.

He returned to care for his 85-year-old grandfather, who was ill with cancer, and decided to stay home despite the attraction of salaries of over $90,000 a year in the oilpatch.

"You miss all those little things, the small-town way of life ... You run into someone here, you're guaranteed to strike up a conversation," he said. "You really miss that."

Stepaniak is retraining in marine engineering technology at the Nova Scotia Community College and expecting to begin a life at sea, possibly in the offshore oil sector.

He and his girlfriend have been hunting for a home in the Margaree Valley, where they plan to settle.

But for Park and his partner Jenny Mosley, 30, the West remains the family's best hope for a secure future.

Each time Park departs, Mosley joins the boys every day in writing down on a blackboard how many "sleeps" until Dad returns, knowing his absence means the bank account will fill up.

Park recalls sitting in an airport two years ago feeling helpless as a distraught Mosley called him to say that Mason had been diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

He said he longed to be home to hold his boy, but also realized work in the oilfield derricks would bring in $80,000 a year, along with a benefits plan for medicine and treatments.

Park's company plan provides full coverage for between $600 and $1,000 in monthly drug costs, while the province's pharmacare program requires that families contribute a portion of costs depending on their income level.

Meanwhile, there are two other boys, Mason's twin brother Maddox and nine-year-old Grady, to provide for.

"When there's no work, there's no planning on getting ahead. It's just planning on getting by," said Mosley, as Mason wriggled into her lap.



Advertisements

Latest Canada & World News

  • Montreal Hudson's Bay store fined $765K for pollutants in St. Lawrence River

    Canada News CTV News
    MONTREAL -- The Bay store in downtown Montreal was fined $765,000 for illegally releasing pollutants into the St. Lawrence River, the Public Prosecution Service of Canada said Friday. But Nathalie Houle of the federal government's public prosecution office was unable to confirm a Montreal La Presse report the fine was imposed after roughly 146 kilograms of PCBs from old transformers on the building's roof leaked into a drain and into the river. Source
  • Trump shut companies tied to Saudi Arabia days after election

    World News CTV News
    WASHINGTON -- Corporate registrations in Delaware show that President-elect Donald Trump shut down some of his companies in the days after the election, including four companies that appeared connected to a possible Saudi Arabia business venture. Source
  • Official: Refrigerator ruled out as source of Oakland fire

    World News CTV News
    OAKLAND, Calif. -- A refrigerator was ruled out as the cause of a fire at a warehouse in Oakland that killed 36 people, but investigators were still looking at electrical systems as possible ignition sources, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives said Friday. Source
  • Florida man shoots ex-wife 4 times in chest at karaoke bar: Cops

    World News Toronto Sun
    Police in Florida say a man shot his ex-wife four times during an argument at an Orlando karaoke bar early Friday morning. Tu Quoc Ho, 43, was arrested and charged with attempted second-degree murder with a firearm, aggravated battery with a firearm, tampering with evidence and domestic violence battery, Orlando News 6 reports. Source
  • Giuliani won't be in cabinet as Trump makes campaign-style stops

    World News CBC News
    Appearing jovial and relaxed, Donald Trump plunged back into election politics Friday, a full month after he won the presidency, enthusiastically prodding Louisiana Republicans to turn out for Saturday's Senate runoff election and protect the party's 52-48 margin in Washington. Source
  • Young deer rescued from thin ice near Woodstock

    Canada News CBC News
    A young deer was rescued from almost certain death near Woodstock on Thursday after getting herself into a slippery situation on the partially frozen St. John River. The yearling doe had been doing her own version of a Bambi-on-ice routine for about two days and must have been close to exhaustion by the time Kenny Tomah spotted her in the middle of the river. Source
  • 'Hard to imagine': Penguin drowning deaths at Calgary Zoo baffling everyone

    Canada News CTV News
    CALGARY -- Watchdog group Zoocheck Canada is calling for surveillance cameras in all animal enclosures following the puzzling drowning deaths of several penguins at the Calgary Zoo. Zoo officials have said a colony of 22 Humboldt penguins was fine when a zookeeper left Wednesday afternoon. Source
  • Toddler safe after car he was in stolen: Ontario police

    Canada News CTV News
    ST. CATHARINES, Ont. - Niagara regional police say a child is safe and apparently in good health after the car he was in was stolen in St. Catharines, Ont. Police say a father reported he'd left the car parked and unattended with the two-year-old inside on Friday afternoon and it was gone when he returned. Source
  • A kiss, a tragedy and a 'miracle': Oakland fire victim's girlfriend finds support online

    World News CTV News
    In the days after Saya Tomioka lost her boyfriend in the Oakland fire, a horrific blaze that killed 36 people at a warehouse party last week, she wrote a Facebook plea for help. She longed to see a photograph of her and her late boyfriend, Griffin Maddens, sharing a kiss in Times Square in the summer of 2015 – but she never got the name of the photographer who captured the fleeting embrace. Source
  • 'Balding Bandit' gets two years for stealing hair growth products

    World News Toronto Sun
    A balding Florida man has been sentenced to two years in prison for stealing hair growth formula in a series of thefts in Ohio. Andres Arias, 36, was arrested in October in Ohio on a charge of engaging in a pattern of corrupt activity, according to the Palm Beach Post. Source