OPP hopes report on missing, murdered indigenous people will yield new tips

The Ontario Provincial Police has released a report on cases of missing and unsolved murders of indigenous people over the last 58 years, in the hopes that it will lead to new tips or information to further the investigations.

See Full Article

Members of the OPP and First Nations leaders released the report Wednesday morning during a news conference. The report covers the period spanning from 1956 to 2014.

The report found that from 1956 to the end of 2014:

Female indigenous homicides/ missing persons

  • There were 54 homicides involving indigenous females. Eight of them remain unsolved and 46 were solved.
  • Of the 46 solved cases: Nine of the victims were murdered by a family member; 17 were murdered by a domestic partner or spouse; 19 were murdered by a person known to the victim; and one was of "unknown circumstances."
  • The solved or "clearance" rate for homicides involving an indigenous woman was 85.2 per cent.
  • There were eight missing indigenous females reported to the OPP, and all remain missing.
  • Foul play is possible or suspected in one of these cases.

The report found that from 1978 to the end of 2014:

Male indigenous homicides/missing persons

  • There were 126 homicides involving indigenous males. Only one of these cases remains unsolved and 125 of them were solved.
  • Of the 125 solved cases: 35 were murdered by family members; 10 were murdered by a domestic partner or spouse; 70 were murdered by a person known to the victim; nine were of "unknown circumstances"; and information for one of the cases is not available.
  • The solved or "clearance" rate for homicides involving an indigenous man was 99.2 per cent.
  • There were 39 cases that involve a missing indigenous man.
  • The OPP believe foul play is possible or suspected for 22 of these cases, and 17 of these individuals are considered missing persons.

The OPP’s overall homicide solved or “clearance rate” from 2010 to 2014 was 92.3 per cent, the report said. The OPP defines a homicide investigation to be solved, when charges are laid, regardless if the charges result in a conviction, officers said at the news conference.

Det.-Supt. Dave Truax said the OPP does not believe that any of the homicides are "serial" in nature, meaning they're likely not the result of a serial killer.

He added that he hopes the release of the report will lead to new tips or information in the unsolved cases.

"I sincerely hope that the information contained in this report will provoke thought, stimulate conversation on this very important societal issue, and may also elicit new information that may assist in these investigations," he said during the news conference.

Commissioner Vince Hawkes said in a statement that he recognizes that in many cases the OPP "cannot reverse the outcomes" for the families of those who have gone missing or were murdered. However, he said he hopes the OPP report potentially leads to a "resolution for the families and communities who have suffered loss."

The OPP report comes days after the Liberal government announced they were launching an inquiry in the missing and murdered aboriginal women. Last week, the government announced they were launching the initial "design phase" of the inquiry, and would be meeting with affected families to seek their input.

Since taking office, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has vowed to rebuild and renew the relationship with indigenous communities on a "nation-to-nation" basis.

On Wednesday, he met with several national aboriginal organizations, including the Assembly of First Nations, the Congress of Aboriginal Peoples, the Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, the Metis National Council and the Native Women's Association of Canada.

He said the government will be seeking to engage and collaborate with these organizations as it moves forward with the inquiry, as well as implementing the recommendations from the Truth and Reconciliation Commission.

"A strong, healthy, co-operative relationship with the leaders of National Aboriginal Organizations is key to making change happen," Trudeau said in a statement. "That is why I am committed to meeting annually with indigenous leaders from across the country."



Advertisements

Latest Canada & World News

  • Trump frees former aides from ethics pledge, lobbying ban

    World News CTV News
    WASHINGTON -- U.S. President Donald Trump, in one of his final acts of office, released current and former members of his administration from the terms of their ethics pledge, which included a five-year ban on lobbying their former agencies. Source
  • Outreach by Tunisian leaders fails to quell youth unrest

    World News CTV News
    TUNIS, TUNISIA -- Tunisian youth clashed with police overnight, maintaining their protests and riots over economic difficulties despite efforts by the president and the prime minister to calm tensions. "Your voice is heard, and your anger is legitimate, and it is my role and the role of the government to work to realize your demands and to make the dream of Tunisia to become true," Prime Minister Hichem Mechichi appealed to the protesters on national television Tuesday night. Source
  • What's different about the coronavirus 'variants of concern' flagged by WHO

    Canada News CBC News
    The seemingly more transmissible variants of the coronavirus first discovered in Britain, South Africa and Brazil are called "variants of concern" by the World Health Organization. Viruses mutate or change all the time to try to gain a selective advantage over other variants or versions of the virus. Source
  • Governments with rookie leaders don't always have it easy in N.L. elections

    Canada News CBC News
    Incumbency is a powerful thing in politics and unseating an incumbent government is no easy feat. But it's a little easier when that incumbent government has a rookie leader at the helm. Especially in Newfoundland and Labrador. Source
  • Parliamentary hearings over Zoom an ongoing headache for translators

    Canada News CBC News
    Each day, translator Nicole Gagnon wakes up and heads to work worried she'll experience further loss of hearing — a sense even more vital to her livelihood than for many workers. Gagnon says she and other federally employed interpreters are suffering from injuries that range from tinnitus, which causes ringing in the ears, to headaches, nausea and "acoustic shock" after nine months of translating parliamentarians online via fuzzy laptop mics and poor internet connections. Source
  • Trump's legacy leaves Arctic with fewer environmental protections and more risk of conflict, experts warn

    World News CBC News
    As U.S. President Donald Trump leaves office, the Arctic is probably far from the minds of most Americans. Yet the region, where the U.S. is one of five nations with territorial waters, has loomed surprisingly large in the waning days of his presidency. Source
  • Netanyahu courts Arab voters in election-year turnabout

    World News CTV News
    JERUSALEM -- Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, who has spent much of his long career casting Israel's Arab minority as a potential fifth column led by terrorist sympathizers, is now openly courting their support as he seeks reelection in the country's fourth vote in less than two years. Source
  • Alibaba's Jack Ma makes first live appearance in three months in online meet

    World News CTV News
    SHANGHAI -- Alibaba Group founder Jack Ma met 100 rural teachers in China via a live video meeting on Wednesday morning, in the businessman's first appearance since October, triggering a sharp jump in the Hong Kong listed shares of the e-commerce giant. Source
  • Trump pardons former top strategist Steve Bannon, says source

    World News CBC News
    U.S. President Donald Trump has granted clemency to former White House aide Steve Bannon as part of a wave of pardons and commutations he will issue during his final hours in office, a senior administration official said. Trump was not expected to pardon himself, members of his family or lawyer Rudy Giuliani, who was at the forefront of unsuccessful efforts to get the results of the 2020 presidential election overturned, according to sources. Source
  • Trump pardons ex-strategist Steve Bannon, dozens of others, in final hours in office

    World News CBC News
    U.S. President Donald Trump has granted clemency to former White House aide Steve Bannon as part of a wave of pardons and commutations he will issue during his final hours in office, a senior administration official said. Trump was not expected to pardon himself, members of his family or lawyer Rudy Giuliani, who was at the forefront of unsuccessful efforts to get the results of the 2020 presidential election overturned, according to sources. Source