Man accused of killing Tina Fontaine scheduled to appear in Winnipeg court

WINNIPEG - A man accused of killing 15-year-old Tina Fontaine is scheduled to appear in a Winnipeg court today.

Raymond Cormier, who is 53, was arrested last week in Vancouver and is charged with the second-degree murder of the teen, whose body was found wrapped in a bag in the Red River on Aug.

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17.

Parole board documents suggest Cormier has a long history of violent crime fuelled by drug addiction.

The parole board revoked Cormier's statutory release in 2012 after he had served time for robbery and noted he was a high risk to reoffend.

The 2012 report says Cormier had at that time racked up over 80 convictions - 17 of which were offences involving violence.

Previous court documents show that since 1978, Cormier has spent more than 23 years in prison for various offences that include assault and theft.

"File information indicates that you were under the influence of illegal substances for most of your past offences and the assaults were most often during your attempt to steal money from your victims for drugs," said the parole board report.

Cormier's lawyer, Pam Smith, did not immediately respond to attempts to reach her for comment, but the Globe and Mail quoted her as saying Cormier will be "contesting the charges."

Calls for an inquiry into missing and murdered aboriginal girls and women grew in intensity and frequency in the weeks following Tina's death.

She had only been in Winnipeg a couple of weeks after leaving her great-aunt's home on the Sagkeeng First Nation, about 70 kilometres northeast of Winnipeg.

Police said Tina became an exploited youth in the Manitoba capital and met Cormier at a residence they both frequented.

Court documents allege Tina was killed around Aug. 10, 2014 - 10 days after she was first reported missing from foster care. Police picked her up two days before it's believed she was killed, but did not take her into custody.

Tina's family has said she was taken into the custody of Child and Family Services and placed in a downtown hotel, but ran away again shortly before she was killed.



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