Ancient Chinese society that collapsed more than 4,000 years ago was wiped out by flooding: study

TORONTO -- More than 4,000 years ago, one of the most advanced societies in ancient China, referred to as “China’s Venice of the Stone Age” for its complex water management system, disappeared suddenly.

The reason for the abrupt collapse of Liangzhu City hasn’t been clear until now, but according to a new study published in the journal Science Advances, the city was wiped out not by war or famine but by an unusually heavy monsoon season, which flooded the region.

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