First 'murder hornet' found in Washington state trap

BLAINE, WASH. -- Washington state agriculture workers have have trapped their first Asian giant hornet.

The hornet was found July 14 in a bottle trap set north of Seattle near the Canadian border, and state entomologists confirmed its identity Wednesday, according to the Washington State Department of Agriculture.

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