Antarctic temperature rises above 20C for first time on record

SAO PAULO, BRAZIL -- Scientists in Antarctica have recorded a new record temperature of 20.75 degrees Celsius (69.35 Fahrenheit), breaking the barrier of 20 degrees for the first time on the continent, a researcher said Thursday.

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