The world's oceans were hottest on record in 2019

PARIS, FRANCE -- The world's oceans were the hottest in recorded history in 2019, scientists said on Tuesday, as manmade emissions warmed seas at an ever-increasing rate with potentially disastrous impacts on Earth's climate.

Oceans absorb more than 90 per cent of excess heat created by greenhouse gas emissions and quantifying how much they have warmed up in recent years gives scientists an accurate read on the rate of global warming.

See Full Article



Advertisements

Latest Tech & Science News

  • Byte, the sequel to Vine and potential competitor to TikTok, launches on mobile

    Tech & Science CTV News
    TikTok teens have a shiny, new toy to try: Byte, a social media platform, has launched on mobile. It's a direct successor to the Vine app, which was discontinued in early 2017 although videos posted to the platform are preserved to this day. Source
  • Pandemic video game 'Plague Inc.' surges in popularity as coronavirus spreads

    Tech & Science CTV News
    TORONTO -- A doomsday video game that simulates the spread of a deadly pandemic has quickly become the bestselling app in several countries amid the coronavirus outbreak. As of Saturday morning, “Plague Inc.” was ranked the top paid-for-app for iOS devices in countries such as China, Canada, U.S. Source
  • Scientists to search for relatives of extinct Galapagos tortoises

    Tech & Science CTV News
    QUITO, ECUADOR -- A scientific expedition to the Galapagos Islands will spend ten days searching for relatives of two tortoise species believed to be extinct, including those of the archipelago's Lonesome George, park officials said Friday. Source
  • Effort to help injured right whale off U.S. coast was first of its kind

    Tech & Science CTV News
    FREDERICTON -- When scientists used a dart to give an antibiotic to a badly injured newborn whale off the coast of Florida last week, it was the first time the system was used for that purpose. Source
  • Spacewalking astronauts close to fixing cosmic ray detector

    Tech & Science CTV News
    CAPE CANAVERAL, FLORIDA -- Spacewalking astronauts worked to complete repairs to a cosmic ray detector outside the International Space Station on Saturday and give it new life. It was the fourth spacewalk since November for NASA's Andrew Morgan and Italy's Luca Parmitano to fix the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer. Source
  • Spacewalking astronauts plug leak in cosmic ray detector

    Tech & Science CTV News
    CAPE CANAVERAL, FLORIDA -- Spacewalking astronauts plugged a leak in a cosmic ray detector outside the International Space Station on Saturday, bringing it another step closer to new life. It was the fourth spacewalk since November for NASA's Andrew Morgan and Italy's Luca Parmitano to fix the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer. Source
  • Spacewalking astronauts plug leak, finish fixing detector

    Tech & Science CTV News
    CAPE CANAVERAL, FLORIDA -- Spacewalking astronauts plugged a leak in a cosmic ray detector outside the International Space Station on Saturday, completing a series of complex repairs to give the instrument new life. The $2 billion Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer could resume its hunt for elusive antimatter and dark matter by midweek. Source
  • U.K.'s proposal to limit Huawei's role in 5G networks most 'pragmatic' path, expert says

    Tech & Science CBC News
    Reports that the United Kingdom plans to limit the use of Huawei equipment to less critical parts of Britain's 5G networks is the most "pragmatic position" for the country, a British cybersecurity expert says. Sources revealed to Reuters this week that senior government officials settled on the recommendation Wednesday, though a final decision is expected to be made at a meeting held by Britain's National Security Council next week. Source
  • Concrete made with bacteria could create self-healing green buildings

    Tech & Science CBC News
    A team of American researchers has developed a new kind of biological concrete that could redefine what we mean by "green buildings." The concrete, developed by researchers at the University of Colorado, Boulder, uses bacteria as a binder. Source
  • The secret to better espresso? It’s all in the math, new study says

    Tech & Science CTV News
    TORONTO -- The best way to efficiently brew espresso with the least amount of wasted coffee is to use coarser grinds that do not clog the filter, according to a new study led by researchers at the University of Portsmouth in the U.K. Source