$10M XPRIZE for software that teaches illiterate to read

LOS ANGELES -- The challenge was to develop software that could easily be downloaded onto tablets that poor children around the world could use to teach themselves to read, write and do simple arithmetic. The incentive was $10 million for the winner.

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