Hubble Space Telescope's main camera stops working

The Hubble Space Telescope's premier camera has shut down because of a hardware problem.

NASA said the camera stopped working Tuesday. Hubble's three other science instruments are still working fine, with celestial observations continuing.

At 17:23 universal time, the Wide Field Camera 3 suspended operations due to a hardware problem.

See Full Article



Advertisements

Latest Tech & Science News

  • After harsh Twitter exchanges, Senate will look at new social-media policy

    Tech & Science CTV News
    OTTAWA -- An independent senator is on a mission to get members of Canada's upper house to stop being so nasty to each other on social media. Tony Dean says recent exchanges on Twitter involving senators and their staff have included "aggressive, harassing and, in some cases, bullying" behaviour. Source
  • What is climate change?

    Tech & Science CBC News
    There has been debate recently about whether climate change should actually be called a "climate crisis" or "climate emergency." Whatever the description, scientists have been observing changes in our environment for years. Here's a look at some of the key concepts. Source
  • Why CBC News is doing a series on climate change

    Tech & Science CBC News
    Climate change is real, it's happening right now and it's in our backyard in devastating, even deadly ways. Its fingerprints are all over this spring's floods and wildfires. Yes, natural emergencies are complex, but powerful and growing evidence shows that climate change is making flooding worse, fires like "The Beast" in Fort McMurray in 2016 more destructiveand heatwaves more life-threatening. Source
  • Overflowing Great Lakes pose new threat for endangered bird

    Tech & Science CTV News
    GLEN HAVEN, Mich. -- Peering through a spotting scope mounted on a tripod, researcher Alice Van Zoeren notices a piping plover skittering across a sandy, pebble-strewn Lake Michigan beach and hopping into a nest, swapping places with its mate. Source
  • Perfectly preserved head of Ice Age wolf found in Siberia

    Tech & Science CTV News
    MOSCOW -- Russian scientists have found the furry head of an Ice Age wolf perfectly preserved in the Siberian permafrost. The head of a wolf, which died 40,000 years ago, was discovered in the Russian Arctic region of Yakutia. Source
  • These N.L. women have plastic-free periods. Why aren't more doing the same?

    Tech & Science CBC News
    Few women would say they're ever excited to see their period return for another cycle, and Kim Thompson used to be one of them. The woman from Portugal Cove-St. Philip's had never been happy using tampons, and the accompanying dry-and-scratchy sensation she felt. Source
  • Tilting your head downward can make you seem more dominant, study suggests

    Tech & Science CTV News
    A new study by the University of British Columbia has found that facial expressions aren’t the only source of information for social and public perception – tilting your head down and lowering your chin by just 10 degrees makes you appear more dominant. Source
  • At least 279 dolphins dead on Gulf Coast, triple usual number: NOAA

    Tech & Science CTV News
    NEW ORLEANS -- Authorities say at least 279 dolphins have stranded across the U.S. Gulf Coast since Feb. 1, triple the usual number. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration scientists say 98% died. They said during a teleconference Friday that they're investigating whether lingering effects from the 2010 oil spill and low salinity from high rivers and a Louisiana spillway opening contributed. Source
  • Canada has a lot of catching up to do on sustainable growth, says panel

    Tech & Science CBC News
    The federal government's Expert Panel on Sustainable Finance says Canada has a long way to go to achieve sustainable growth — and in its final report, being released today, it says financial markets will play a fundamental role in unlocking that economic potential. Source
  • Thai vets nurture lost dugong calf with milk and sea grass

    Tech & Science CTV News
    BANGKOK -- A baby dugong that has developed an attachment to humans after being separated from its mother and getting lost in the ocean off southern Thailand is being nurtured by marine experts in hopes that it can one day fend for itself. Source