Barcode-like 'warming stripes' show how Toronto’s average temperatures have changed

A climate scientist from the United Kingdom has released a series of barcode-like images that illustrate the long-term changes in temperatures since records began from places around the world, including Toronto.

Ed Hawkins, a climate scientist with the National Centre for Atmospheric Science at the University of Reading, calls the visualizations “warming stripes.

See Full Article



Advertisements

Latest Tech & Science News

  • Cyclone size of Texas discovered on Jupiter by NASA's Juno mission

    Tech & Science CTV News
    CNN -- NASA's Juno mission spotted a new cyclone the size of Texas during a close flyby of Jupiter in November. The gas giant is already home to several giant cyclones, and this newly discovered storm will offer even more insight into Jupiter's atmosphere. Source
  • Researchers create new plastic wrap that even fends off deadly superbugs

    Tech & Science CTV News
    TORONTO -- A new "self-cleaning" plastic developed by a team of scientists can prevent bacteria and viruses from sticking and proliferating on its surface, McMaster University said on Friday. The material is similar to the conventional thin, transparent plastic wraps many use to keep food fresh, but its surface is textured with microscopic wrinkles and chemically treated so that everything that comes into contact with it -- from bacteria to a drop of blood -- simply bounces off. Source
  • Thousands of 'penis fish' litter California beach

    Tech & Science CTV News
    TORONTO -- Before you avert your eyes, they’re not what you might think they are. The thousands of pink, pulsating phallic creatures that were discovered on a northern California beach after a recent storm are actually marine worms. Source
  • EU commits to being climate neutral by 2050, but without Poland

    Tech & Science CBC News
    The European Union left Poland out of a 2050 climate neutrality agreement on Friday after hours of summit haggling with three poorer eastern member states that demanded more funds for economic transition and support for nuclear power. Source
  • Fitness trackers for kids: Weighing the pros and cons of wearable technology

    Tech & Science CTV News
    TORONTO -- Are wearable fitness trackers good for your children? With some companies marketing their products directly to kids, it may be on their Christmas wish list this year. But what are the benefits of your child wearing one and how does it affect their behaviour? Source
  • Leaving home benefits male squirrels but not females, study shows

    Tech & Science CBC News
    Male red squirrels in North America that live away from their home population reap better benefits in life while female squirrels do not, a study from the University of Alberta has found. The study, released Friday morning, looks at 30 years worth of data on the red squirrel population in the Yukon. Source
  • Why smaller may be better when it comes harnessing Bay of Fundy tides

    Tech & Science CBC News
    The latest company in the race to harness electricity from the powerful Bay of Fundy tides is bypassing Nova Scotia's original tidal power demonstration site in the Minas Passage to deploy smaller turbines in an area with less powerful currents. Source
  • Why smaller may be better when it comes to harnessing Bay of Fundy tides

    Tech & Science CBC News
    The latest company in the race to harness electricity from the powerful Bay of Fundy tides is bypassing Nova Scotia's original tidal power demonstration site in the Minas Passage to deploy smaller turbines in an area with less powerful currents. Source
  • Europe is sending a robot to clean up space. Why is the junk there in the first place?

    Tech & Science CTV News
    A self-destructing robot will be sent into orbit on the world's first space cleanup mission, European scientists announced Monday, a fresh approach to fixing up the galaxy's junk graveyard. Our orbit is filled with garbage, including chunks of dead satellites, discarded rockets, and paint flecks that have fallen off them. Source
  • World's 1st floating dairy farm could help cities adapt to climate change

    Tech & Science CBC News
    As you approach the Port of Rotterdam, Europe's largest, the usual sights come into focus: cranes, barges, shipping containers, seagulls. But down a busy industrial road toward the water, something surprising appears on the horizon: cows. Source