#TRENDING: Drinking the Apple-flavoured Kool-Aid

Every time I think I'm out, they pull me back in.

Although let's face it, I never really wanted out.

Apple on Tuesday reminded the world why they're the most innovative electronics company in the world, and reminded me why I'll keep drinking the apple-flavoured Kool-Aid.

See Full Article

Forget the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus, one of which I will absolutely be shelling out for as an upgrade to my iPhone 5, the big news out of Cupertino was the Apple Watch.

Here's the thing with Apple: So much speculation leading up to their product launches usually results in a slightly disappointing experience when the rumours are mostly confirmed to be true.

But while we all knew the Apple Watch, or iWatch, was forthcoming, I doubt anyone expected what CEO Tim Cook announced Tuesday.

The naysayers will denounce the fact you must own an iPhone for the iWatch to work properly, but that's just smart business.

For me, things like an on-board heart-rate monitor and the ability to track how active you are throughout the day are both impressive and important to getting more people moving.

Most notably though, the Apple Watch is the first smart watch that doesn't look like something out of Star Trek or like one of those calculator watches popular in the early 1990s.

The Apple Watch has two sizes, three finishes and a variety of wristbands, which will all combine to make this massively popular.

From what I can tell, Canadian reaction to the news Tuesday went one of three ways: People were very excited; they couldn't care less; or they inferred it was anti-Canadian to like Apple products.

“I hope you spend as much time on the new #Blackberry#Passport in a couple of weeks,” wrote one of my Twitter followers.

Let's face it though, I won't. Here's the thing: If Blackberry were still making products that people actually wanted to stand hours in line for, I'd be far more interested. The problem is they just don't.

Apple sucked me into their empire with the first iPhone in 2007. I bought one in the U.S. before they were available in Canada and figured out how to make it work here. Since then, I've owned a 3, 3G, 4S (which was stolen by a couple of little punks at a Starbucks in Niagara Falls) and now a 5. I don't love everything Apple makes, which is why I still prefer PC computers, but my personal feeling is there's no phone on the market that can touch the iPhone.

If that makes me somehow less Canadian, then so be it.

NOTE: This marks the return of Dan Dakin's #Trending column on social media and technology. If you have a column idea, or a comment, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. You can follow Dan on Twitter @dandakinmedia or on Facebook at www.facebook.com/dandakinmedia.

Poll

Would you consider buying an Apple Watch?

  • 0%
  • Yes, I'll buy one for sure
  • 0 votes

  • 0%
  • I might
  • 0 votes

  • 0%
  • I would, if I owned an iPhone
  • 0 votes

  • 0%
  • No chance
  • 0 votes



Advertisements

Latest Tech & Science News

  • These N.L. women have plastic-free periods. Why aren't more doing the same?

    Tech & Science CBC News
    Few women would say they're ever excited to see their period return for another cycle, and Kim Thompson used to be one of them. The woman from Portugal Cove-St. Philip's had never been happy using tampons, and the accompanying dry-and-scratchy sensation she felt. Source
  • Tilting your head downward can make you seem more dominant, study suggests

    Tech & Science CTV News
    A new study by the University of British Columbia has found that facial expressions aren’t the only source of information for social and public perception – tilting your head down and lowering your chin by just 10 degrees makes you appear more dominant. Source
  • At least 279 dolphins dead on Gulf Coast, triple usual number: NOAA

    Tech & Science CTV News
    NEW ORLEANS -- Authorities say at least 279 dolphins have stranded across the U.S. Gulf Coast since Feb. 1, triple the usual number. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration scientists say 98% died. They said during a teleconference Friday that they're investigating whether lingering effects from the 2010 oil spill and low salinity from high rivers and a Louisiana spillway opening contributed. Source
  • Canada has a lot of catching up to do on sustainable growth, says panel

    Tech & Science CBC News
    The federal government's Expert Panel on Sustainable Finance says Canada has a long way to go to achieve sustainable growth — and in its final report, being released today, it says financial markets will play a fundamental role in unlocking that economic potential. Source
  • Thai vets nurture lost dugong calf with milk and sea grass

    Tech & Science CTV News
    BANGKOK -- A baby dugong that has developed an attachment to humans after being separated from its mother and getting lost in the ocean off southern Thailand is being nurtured by marine experts in hopes that it can one day fend for itself. Source
  • 'They were pioneers': Celebrations mark 100th anniversary of 1st non-stop transatlantic flight

    Tech & Science CBC News
    Aviation worldwide was forever changed a century ago when British pilots Capt. John Alcock and Lt. Arthur Whitten Brown boarded their modified First World War Vickers Vimy bomber in Newfoundland and crossed the Atlantic Ocean to Ireland, making the first-ever successful non-stop transatlantic flight. Source
  • Charlottetown company aims to build zero-emissions Lake Ontario ferry

    Tech & Science CBC News
    A Charlottetown company is one of 10 that's been awarded money from Transport Canada's new $2.4 million clean transportation fund. Redrock Power Systems has been given $15,000 towards a $35,000 feasibility study on a zero-emissions passenger ferry it wants to develop for Lake Ontario. Source
  • Emails show Trump official consulting climate-change rejecters

    Tech & Science CTV News
    WASHINGTON -- A Trump administration national security official has sought help from advisers to a think-tank that disavows climate change to challenge widely accepted scientific findings on global warming, according to his emails. The request from William Happer, a member of the National Security Council, is included in emails from 2018 and 2019 that were obtained by the Environmental Defence Fund under the federal Freedom of Information Act and provided to The Associated Press. Source
  • Emails: Trump official consulted global warming rejecters

    Tech & Science CTV News
    WASHINGTON -- A Trump administration national security official has sought help from advisers to a think-tank that disavows climate change to challenge widely accepted scientific findings on global warming, according to his emails. The request from William Happer, a member of the National Security Council, is included in emails from 2018 and 2019 that were obtained by the Environmental Defence Fund under the federal Freedom of Information Act and provided to The Associated Press. Source
  • McKenna announces carbon tax on Alberta a week after province kills former tax

    Tech & Science CBC News
    Environment Minister Catherine McKenna says she has given notice to the provincial government in Alberta that the federal government will begin imposing its price on carbon in the province beginning Jan.1, 2020. McKenna made the announcement in Ottawa today, a week after Alberta's Lt. Source