Inventive green solutions offer environmentally friendly burial alternatives

A business in Smiths Falls, Ont., that uses a high-pressure caustic solution to dissolve human remains — and then discharges that fluid into the town's sewer system — is the latest initiative by companies and consumers to find a more environmentally friendly way to handle the bodies of the deceased.

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