Scientists use ultrasounds to study shark reproduction

BIDDEFORD, Maine -- Scientists say ultrasound technology normally used on pregnant women can be used to gain insights about the reproduction of tiger sharks.

See Full Article

Researchers from the University of New England and University of Miami say their study of the use of ultrasounds on the sharks offers a less invasive way to investigate the sharks' biology.

They say the ultrasounds allow scientists a way to determine the presence of embryos in sharks while keeping the animals alive. Previous efforts normally involved dissecting the animals.

The researchers performed in-water ultrasounds on live tiger sharks and took blood samples for hormone analysis at Tiger Beach in the Bahamas.

University of New England professor James Sulikowski says the research found that a high number of tiger sharks were pregnant during the winter months.



Advertisements

Latest Tech & Science News

  • Why seeing a star crash is a 'watershed moment in astrophysics'

    Tech & Science CBC News
    Scientists have followed gravitational waves to something they've never seen before — the collision of two exotic objects called neutron stars. By observing a fleeting star-like object in the sky in August, they've learned a lot of new things about the universe worth clinking glasses over. Source
  • Smartphone makers duking it out with high-tech features

    Tech & Science CTV News
    The front lines of the battle for smartphone dominance over the coming years have grown clearer after Chinese technology firm Huawei presented an AI-powered phone designed to go head-to-head with Samsung and Apple. Features needed to propel a device into the top end are growing increasingly complex and expensive to develop, meaning only the companies with the deepest expertise and pockets can hope to compete. Source
  • Google offers heightened security for 'high-risk' users

    Tech & Science CTV News
    Google said Tuesday it would offer stronger online security for "high risk" users who may be frequent targets of online attacks. The U.S. technology titan said anyone with a personal Google account can enroll in the new "advanced protection," while noting that it will require users to "trade off a bit of convenience" for extra security. Source
  • Researchers call for offshore oil action as Newfoundland seabirds vanish

    Tech & Science CTV News
    ST. JOHN'S, N.L. -- Millions of seabirds have vanished since offshore oil production started off Newfoundland 20 years ago, and researchers say there's an urgent need to better monitor related environmental effects. They say a colony of small nocturnal birds called Leach's storm petrels has shrunk dramatically. Source
  • Microsoft rolls out new Windows 10 update and laptops

    Tech & Science CTV News
    In this Thursday, May 11, 2017, file photo, Terry Myerson, executive vice president of the Windows and Devices Group, speaks at the Microsoft Build 2017 developers conference, in Seattle. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File) Source
  • Secret Microsoft database of unfixed vulnerabilities hacked in 2013

    Tech & Science CBC News
    Microsoft Corp's secret internal database for tracking bugs in its own software was broken into by a highly sophisticated hacking group more than four years ago, according to five former employees, in only the second known breach of such a corporate database. Source
  • Study: Eclipse brought an estimated 616K people to Nebraska

    Tech & Science CTV News
    LINCOLN, Neb. -- A study says the solar eclipse brought an estimated 616,000 out-of-state visitors to Nebraska. The study by Dean Runyan and Associates and Destination Analysts Inc. was done for the Nebraska Tourism Commission. Source
  • Light in the sky over U.A.E. likely Russian rocket breaking up

    Tech & Science CTV News
    DUBAI, United Arab Emirates -- A light seen in the night sky over the United Arab Emirates likely was a discarded Russian spaceship breaking up after re-entering the Earth's atmosphere. Those in Abu Dhabi and Dubai shared online videos and pictures of the light seen in the sky Monday night. Source
  • Greenpeace faults many tech giants for environment impact

    Tech & Science CTV News
    SEOUL, Korea, Republic Of -- The environmental group Greenpeace issued a report on Tuesday giving technology titans including Samsung Electronics, Amazon and Huawei low marks for their environmental impact. Many of the biggest technology companies failed to deliver on commitments to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases and are still reluctant to commit fully to renewable energy, according to Greenpeace USA's Guide to Greener Electronics. Source
  • Greenpeace blasts tech giants for environmental impact

    Tech & Science CTV News
    SEOUL, Korea, Republic Of - The environmental group Greenpeace issued a report on Tuesday giving technology titans including Samsung Electronics, Amazon and Huawei low marks for their environmental impact. Many of the biggest technology companies failed to deliver on commitments to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases and are still reluctant to commit fully to renewable energy, according to Greenpeace USA's Guide to Greener Electronics. Source