SpaceX launches satellite, but fails to land rocket on barge

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- SpaceX has another launch under its belt, but not another rocket landing.

The unmanned Falcon 9 rocket blasted off at sunset Friday, carrying a broadcasting satellite for Luxembourg-based company SES.

See Full Article

It was the fifth launch attempt over the past 1 1/2 weeks; Sunday's try ended with an engine shutdown a split second before liftoff.

As it has tried before, SpaceX attempted to land the discarded first-stage booster. The target was a barge in the Atlantic, 400 miles offshore. Right before touchdown 10 minutes into the flight, the TV camera on the platform cut out, drawing loud groans from the crowd gathered at company headquarters in Hawthorne, California.

More than a half-hour later, the private company indicated the test was unsuccessful.

SpaceX never expected the test to succeed given the hefty, high-flying payload. This mission required that the booster fly much faster than usual and therefore burn up more fuel, leaving less for a precision touchdown. SpaceX scored a rocket landing on the ground at Cape Canaveral in December, but has yet to nail a trickier floating barge landing.

There were plenty of cheers, though, as the second-stage successfully lifted the satellite higher and higher, and even more when the satellite separated successfully in full camera view.

Company chief Elon Musk reported the target altitude of 40,600 kilometres -- more than 25,000 miles -- was achieved. "Thanks ?åòSES--Satellites for riding on Falcon 9! Looking forward to future missions," he tweeted.

Musk wants to retrieve and refly boosters to save time and money. Usually, the boosters just fall into the sea. SES chief technology officer Martin Halliwell said last week that his company would have "no problem" launching a satellite on a recycled SpaceX rocket.

SpaceX is working to recover from a launch accident last summer shortly after liftoff. It hopes to resume space station deliveries for NASA in the next month or so.



Advertisements

Latest Tech & Science News

  • Apple poised to expand into speaker market with HomePod

    Tech & Science CTV News
    SAN FRANCISCO -- Apple is finally ready to launch its attempt to compete with the internet-connected speakers made by Amazon and Google with the release of its long-awaited HomePod. Pre-orders for the HomePod will begin Friday in the U.S, U.K. Source
  • Why B.C. and Alaska avoided a massive tsunami

    Tech & Science CBC News
    Coastal communities in British Columbia and Alaska were evacuated to higher ground early this morning after tsunami warning sirens blared following a large earthquake off the coast of Alaska. But the warning was later cancelled without any reported tsunami damage. Source
  • Tsunami warning: How to respond when the alert is raised

    Tech & Science CTV News
    VANCOUVER -- Some facts on tsunamis after a warning on Tuesday caused people in communities along the coast of British Columbia to head to higher ground: What is a tsunami? Japanese for "harbour wave," a tsunami is a series of huge ocean waves caused by a rapid and large-scale disturbance of sea water. Source
  • AI can read! Tech firms race to smarten up thinking machines

    Tech & Science CTV News
    PROVIDENCE, R.I. -- Seven years ago, a computer beat two human quizmasters on a "Jeopardy" challenge. Ever since, the tech industry has been training its machines even harder to make them better at amassing knowledge and answering questions. Source
  • Fisheries minister to outline measures aimed at protecting endangered whales

    Tech & Science CTV News
    MONCTON, N.B. -- The federal fisheries minister is expected to announce new measures today aimed at protecting North Atlantic right whales. Dominic LeBlanc is planning to outline the initiatives this morning in Moncton, N.B. Source
  • Ottawa announces four new measures in effort to protect right whales

    Tech & Science CTV News
    MONCTON, N.B. -- The federal fisheries minister has announced four immediate measures for the crab fishery in an effort to protect North Atlantic right whales from entanglement with fishing gear. Dominic LeBlanc says new rules will greatly reduce the amount of rope that can be left floating on the surface when crab pots are set to just 3.7 metres. Source
  • Astronauts go spacewalking to give new hand to Canadarm2

    Tech & Science CBC News
    Spacewalking astronauts are giving a hand to the International Space Station's big robot arm. NASA astronauts Mark Vande Hei and Scott Tingle floated outdoors Tuesday to install the new mechanical gripper. Because of the lingering effects of the government shutdown, the beginning of the spacewalk was not broadcast live on NASA TV. Source
  • Astronauts go spacewalking to give new hand to robot arm

    Tech & Science CTV News
    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Spacewalking astronauts gave a hand to the International Space Station's big robot arm Tuesday. As the federal government geared back up 250 miles below, NASA astronauts Mark Vande Hei and Scott Tingle floated outdoors to install the new mechanical gripper. Source
  • Spacewalking astronauts give new hand to robot arm

    Tech & Science CTV News
    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Spacewalking astronauts gave a hand to the International Space Station's big robot arm Tuesday. As the federal government geared back up 250 miles below, NASA astronauts Mark Vande Hei and Scott Tingle successfully installed the new mechanical gripper. Source
  • Flood of garbage stirs uproar in Lebanon

    Tech & Science CTV News
    ZOUQ MOSBEH, Lebanon -- Environmentalists say a winter storm has pushed a wave of trash onto a Lebanese shore just outside Beirut, stirring outrage over a waste management crisis that has choked the country since 2015. Source