Scott Kelly: Tired, joints ache, can't sink basketball

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(Pat Sullivan / AP)"> NASA astronaut Scott Kelly, left, & his twin Mark

NASA astronaut Scott Kelly, left, and his twin Mark before a press conference in Houston, on March 4, 2016. (Pat Sullivan / AP)

International Space Station (ISS) crew member Scott Kelly of the U.S. shows a victory sign after landing near the town of Dzhezkazgan, Kazakhstan, on Wednesday, March 2, 2016. (Krill Kudryavtsev/Pool photo via AP)



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