Pepper, the charming humanoid robot, makes Canadian debut

It's nearly four-feet tall, full of personality and would like nothing more than to bring you joy.

Pepper, a robot that’s designed to recognize human emotions and react accordingly, made its Canadian debut in Toronto on Wednesday.

See Full Article

"I'm a sophisticated combination of hardware and software designed to interact with humans and bring them joy," Pepper told CTV Toronto during a conference on the future of retail.

The humanoid companion robot reads your mood and acts appropriately, so if you're happy, it's happy, and if you're down it will try to cheer you up.

"Pepper is designed to engage you using the cues and clues from your emotional state," Steve Carlin of Aldebaran Roboticstold CTV Toronto.

He said Pepper’s camera understands body language.

"So if you tilt your head one way or another, it's extrapolating from that," he said.

Carlin added that Pepper takes note of humans’ facial features to determine if they’re smiling on frowning and listens to the intonation in their voice to determine their mood.

The hairless robot with big eyes and a soft voice is already a common fixture in stores and homes in Japan.

When it went for sale in the country earlier this year for 198,000 yen (US$1,600), it sold out within a minute.

There's no word on when Pepper will be available in Canada or how much it will cost.

With a report from CTV Toronto's Scott Lightfoot



Advertisements

Latest Tech & Science News

  • Experimental toilet diverts urine to make fertilizer

    Tech & Science CTV News
    This photo shows a special toilet that diverts urine for fertilizer, at the University of Michigan engineering building in Ann Arbor, Mich., on Tuesday, Jan. 24, 2017. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio) Source
  • Samsung Galaxy S8 to feature smaller case, more screen space: report

    Tech & Science CTV News
    A new report lines up with previous rumors about April's expected addition to Samsung's set of flagship handsets, the Galaxy S8. Ahead of a March announcement and an April launch, two Samsung Galaxy S8 variants are being prepared with an emphasis on case size reduction and screen size maximization. Source
  • Google's Chromebook comes of age

    Tech & Science CTV News
    With new devices and now access to the entirety of the Google Play Store, the Chromebook is about to become a computer that puts a premium on productivity and practicality but without a premium price tag. Source
  • There's no place like home: NASA releases beautiful satellite photos of Earth

    Tech & Science CBC News
    NASA and and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) have released incredible photos of home taken from a new satellite orbiting Earth called GOES-16. The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) are a number of satellites that both agencies have used to monitor meteorological conditions across the globe. Source
  • U of A research shows fracking fluids cause 'significant' harm to fish

    Tech & Science CTV News
    EDMONTON -- Research has found that liquids used to frack oil and gas wells can harm fish. A newly published paper by University of Alberta scientists concludes the water that flows from such wells causes significant damage. Source
  • Google, Facebook say they'll roll out tools to sift fake Canadian news

    Tech & Science CTV News
    OTTAWA -- Two of the world's biggest digital information platforms say they're getting ready to roll out tools in Canada designed to crack down on so-called "fake news." The phenomenon of false or misleading information being widely disseminated online became a major storyline in the U.S. Source
  • How the internet is turning us all into 'mean girls'

    Tech & Science CBC News
    In the moments leading up to last week's presidential inauguration, Barry Bennett, a commentator on PBS's NewsHour, remarked that "division is the new normal." Ironically, that's probably the one thing we can all agree on. No matter your political beliefs, we can all see it: we are divided. Source
  • The internet has fostered a new kind of tribalism, and it's destroying the way we interact

    Tech & Science CBC News
    In the moments leading up to last week's presidential inauguration, Barry Bennett, a commentator on PBS's NewsHour, remarked that "division is the new normal." Ironically, that's probably the one thing we can all agree on. No matter your political beliefs, we can all see it: we are divided. Source
  • Japan's military launches first communications satellite

    Tech & Science CTV News
    Japan's H-2A rocket carrying Defense Ministry's first communications satellite Kirameki-2 goes up goes up after its launch from the Tanegashima Space Center in Minamitane on Tanegashima Island, southern Japan, Tuesday, Jan. 24, 2017. (Yu Nakajima/Kyodo News via AP) Source
  • Jet lag can adversely affect Major League Baseball players: study

    Tech & Science CBC News
    A new study has found the jet lag that goes with a grinding schedule of Major League Baseball games that takes players from coast to coast and back again can take its toll on performance. Source